brianaw

22 Dec 2010 233 views
 
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photoblog image Great Central Railway Autumn Gala 3/5

Great Central Railway Autumn Gala 3/5

The main gala at the Great Central Railway is normally held in October and is sponsored by Steam Railway magazine.  This short series of 5 images, converted to B&W.which hopefully gives an old look to each, features three visiting engines to the railway, two of them for the first time.

 

A first time visitor to the railway was this delightful J72 tank locomotive seen hauling a freight towards Loughborough.  When I took this I now discover I was but a few yards from Les Auld who I had previously met at the Stratford meet in April, but sadly, with the large crowds about our paths didn't cross on this occasion.

 

In case you don't want to read all the details below I have recently done a Christmas project for the GetInThePicture website on behalf the local church we attend.  I hope you enjoy them, I took them all but two of those in the second row, as those who have met us will realise. The image bottom right is our sons partner and our grandchildren, the girl was having a "strop" at the time and wouldn't dress up.

 

The N.E.R. E1 Class of locomotive is a remarkable design being unique in that it was constructed over a period of 54 years, by 3 different railway companies. Designed by Wilson Worsdell for the N.E.R. and introduced in December 1898, the first 20 engines were built at North Road Works, Darlington by 1899. Sir Vincent Raven, who succeeded Worsdell, had 20 more built in 1914 with very slight modifications to the original design, then a further 10 were built in 1920 and another 25 by Armstrong Whitworth at Newcastle in 1922/3. Sir Nigel Gresley for the newly formed L.N.E.R. re-classed the engines as J72’s and then built 10 at Doncaster in 1925. And then remarkably 54 years after they were first introduced British Railways built a further batch at Darlington, 20 in 1949 and 8 in 1951, bringing the class total to 113.

 

These 0-6-0T's were used in shunting yards, railway owned docks and coal staithes and on station pilot workings all over the Northeast. Eventually they were found further afield at Wrexham, Kittybrewster at Aberdeen, Keith and Kipps. The last batch were almost identical to the original but were given a vacuum brake, steam heating and sanding gear to enable them to be used on empty passenger stock workings, in addition, some of the earlier engines were similarly modified. The N.E.R. and L.N.E.R. built engines became under B.R. No's 68670 to 68754 and as no provision had been made for further construction the last batch had to be numbered in a special series and came out as No's 69001 to 69028. All 113 remained in service until 1958, when following the introduction of diesel shunters some of the earlier engines began to be withdrawn from traffic.

 

By 1964 and all but two of the class had been scrapped, mostly at Darlington North Road or at T.J. Thomson Ltd. of Stockton-on-Tees. The two exceptions were 69005 and 69023, which were taken into Departmental Stock as No. 58 and No. 59 initially at Gateshead but latterly at North Blyth and Heaton, where they were used for de-icing. Both withdrawn near the end of steam in the Northeast, No. 69005 was scrapped but 69023 became the only survivor when it was purchased by Mr. R. Ainsworth for preservation.

69023 in Preservation

 

69023 was delivered to the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway in 1969 where it was restored with its original number, in N.E.R. livery and named 'Joem', this being taken from the names of his father Joseph, 50 years service with the L.N.W.R., and his mother Emmeline. Later 'Joem' saw service on the Derwent Valley Railway at York but following the death of its owner the locomotive was put into store at the National Railway Museum, awaiting disposal.

 

69023 was then purchased by the N.E.L.P.G. and delivered to Grosmont in January 1983, remaining in traffic until late 1985 before undergoing overhaul at I.C.I. Wilton. At the same time a repaint in N.E.R./BR pattern lined green was undertaken, this style of livery was inspired by British Railways action in repainting two J72's No’s 68723 and 68736, for use on station pilot duties at Newcastle and York in N.E.R. green in the early 1960's.

 

Following restoration at ICI Wilton 69023 returned to the N.Y.M.R. where it regularly hauled lightweight trains as well as its more usual role of station pilot at Grosmont. Being small and easily transportable by road 69023 also visited many other railways, including the North Norfolk, Yorkshire Dales, South Devon Steam, East Somerset, Swanage, Bo'ness and Kinneil Railway, the Great Western Society at Didcot and it also attend open days at Hartlepool Power Station and BR’s Thornaby depot.

 

 

Great Central Railway Autumn Gala 3/5

The main gala at the Great Central Railway is normally held in October and is sponsored by Steam Railway magazine.  This short series of 5 images, converted to B&W.which hopefully gives an old look to each, features three visiting engines to the railway, two of them for the first time.

 

A first time visitor to the railway was this delightful J72 tank locomotive seen hauling a freight towards Loughborough.  When I took this I now discover I was but a few yards from Les Auld who I had previously met at the Stratford meet in April, but sadly, with the large crowds about our paths didn't cross on this occasion.

 

In case you don't want to read all the details below I have recently done a Christmas project for the GetInThePicture website on behalf the local church we attend.  I hope you enjoy them, I took them all but two of those in the second row, as those who have met us will realise. The image bottom right is our sons partner and our grandchildren, the girl was having a "strop" at the time and wouldn't dress up.

 

The N.E.R. E1 Class of locomotive is a remarkable design being unique in that it was constructed over a period of 54 years, by 3 different railway companies. Designed by Wilson Worsdell for the N.E.R. and introduced in December 1898, the first 20 engines were built at North Road Works, Darlington by 1899. Sir Vincent Raven, who succeeded Worsdell, had 20 more built in 1914 with very slight modifications to the original design, then a further 10 were built in 1920 and another 25 by Armstrong Whitworth at Newcastle in 1922/3. Sir Nigel Gresley for the newly formed L.N.E.R. re-classed the engines as J72’s and then built 10 at Doncaster in 1925. And then remarkably 54 years after they were first introduced British Railways built a further batch at Darlington, 20 in 1949 and 8 in 1951, bringing the class total to 113.

 

These 0-6-0T's were used in shunting yards, railway owned docks and coal staithes and on station pilot workings all over the Northeast. Eventually they were found further afield at Wrexham, Kittybrewster at Aberdeen, Keith and Kipps. The last batch were almost identical to the original but were given a vacuum brake, steam heating and sanding gear to enable them to be used on empty passenger stock workings, in addition, some of the earlier engines were similarly modified. The N.E.R. and L.N.E.R. built engines became under B.R. No's 68670 to 68754 and as no provision had been made for further construction the last batch had to be numbered in a special series and came out as No's 69001 to 69028. All 113 remained in service until 1958, when following the introduction of diesel shunters some of the earlier engines began to be withdrawn from traffic.

 

By 1964 and all but two of the class had been scrapped, mostly at Darlington North Road or at T.J. Thomson Ltd. of Stockton-on-Tees. The two exceptions were 69005 and 69023, which were taken into Departmental Stock as No. 58 and No. 59 initially at Gateshead but latterly at North Blyth and Heaton, where they were used for de-icing. Both withdrawn near the end of steam in the Northeast, No. 69005 was scrapped but 69023 became the only survivor when it was purchased by Mr. R. Ainsworth for preservation.

69023 in Preservation

 

69023 was delivered to the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway in 1969 where it was restored with its original number, in N.E.R. livery and named 'Joem', this being taken from the names of his father Joseph, 50 years service with the L.N.W.R., and his mother Emmeline. Later 'Joem' saw service on the Derwent Valley Railway at York but following the death of its owner the locomotive was put into store at the National Railway Museum, awaiting disposal.

 

69023 was then purchased by the N.E.L.P.G. and delivered to Grosmont in January 1983, remaining in traffic until late 1985 before undergoing overhaul at I.C.I. Wilton. At the same time a repaint in N.E.R./BR pattern lined green was undertaken, this style of livery was inspired by British Railways action in repainting two J72's No’s 68723 and 68736, for use on station pilot duties at Newcastle and York in N.E.R. green in the early 1960's.

 

Following restoration at ICI Wilton 69023 returned to the N.Y.M.R. where it regularly hauled lightweight trains as well as its more usual role of station pilot at Grosmont. Being small and easily transportable by road 69023 also visited many other railways, including the North Norfolk, Yorkshire Dales, South Devon Steam, East Somerset, Swanage, Bo'ness and Kinneil Railway, the Great Western Society at Didcot and it also attend open days at Hartlepool Power Station and BR’s Thornaby depot.

 

 

comments (21)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 22 Dec 2010, 00:26
Good photo well processed
Brian Walbey: Thanks vintage.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 22 Dec 2010, 01:51
Love the smoke play.
Brian Walbey: Yes, the benefit of the cold air unlike the summer when one dosen't see it so much.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 22 Dec 2010, 05:23
Very pretty little locos Brian: there used to be one in NER livery as station pilot at York I recall
Brian Walbey: I thought this was a great loco Chris, and I believe you are right about the York pilot.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 22 Dec 2010, 06:35
NIcely captured Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Tony.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 22 Dec 2010, 08:16
The little engine that could. I love these specimens, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It could indeed Ginnie, a fine workhorse during the day.
You make a fine Mary and Joseph Briansmile
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill, fortunately we are not in danger of having any more children though smile
What a gem of an engine, it's not called Thomas by any chance?
Brian Walbey: It is a great little engine Martin. i guess it could be used for a Thomas event.
Now that is the sort of engine that all baby boomer kids used to draw pictures of
Brian Walbey: Me included Richard.
  • Aussie
  • wet wet wet rocky
  • 22 Dec 2010, 09:36
like the conversion b&w suits it so well
Brian Walbey: Thanks Aussie.
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Dec 2010, 09:51
Beautiful old engine.
Brian Walbey: I really enjoyed seeing this one for the first time Ingrid.
  • Chantal
  • Nederland
  • 22 Dec 2010, 09:53
I love it, just last night I watched Unstoppable, right into your theme
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chantal.
Boys will be men and men will be boys.
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed Chad, and if the weather clears up next week i will be taking Maureen for a ride on the GCR, we haven't done that for years.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Dec 2010, 12:34
A fine little workhorse, Brian. Popular with her crew, too, by the look of it.

As regards the nativity, "never work with animals or children" comes to mind; difficult in that case!
Brian Walbey: A great little engine Alan. We couldn't get a donkey or lamb so the dog had to be a substitute, mind you it is a lovely dog inreality.
Almost looks like a toy engine, Brian. Not much headroom for the two chaps.

Processing is wonderful.
Brian Walbey: Thanks beverly, the cab roof is a bit low isn't it.
Great little tankie!
Brian Walbey: She is indeed Tom.
Fine old locomotive smile
Brian Walbey: She is indeed John, thanks.
Great capture!
Merry Christmas Brian!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Rs, and a happy christmas to you also.
  • Peter
  • Canada
  • 22 Dec 2010, 19:03
This is a great photo of 69023 Brian...capturing the Engineer is having a chat with the Stoker in the cab...."MORE COAL..!* !* !*"....petergrin
Brian Walbey: Thanks Peter, it is good how these guys work together as a tem to drive these things.
another cracking photo brian
Brian Walbey: Many thanks derek.
lovely old engine smile
Brian Walbey: She is indeed Charles.
An amazing story and delightful picture.
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed, many thanks Graeme.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Olympus E-450
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/125s
aperture f/5.6
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 23.0mm
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