brianaw

13 Nov 2009 346 views
 
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photoblog image Charnwood Road Baptist Church, Shepshed

Charnwood Road Baptist Church, Shepshed

On Sundays Maureen and I generally go to this church if possible.  Maureen has been going for the twenty years we have lived here and is now a Deacon. I started attending more frequently a few years ago.  It is a delightful little Baptist Chapel and the following tells you a bit more about it:

The church was founded in 1693 and now in 2009 will be 316 years old.  It has been at its present location in Charnwood Road since 7th May 1834 when the new chapel building was opened.

 

There were Baptists in the Shepshed and Rempstone areas and in 1693 they joined together and for a time the community met for worship in the front parlour of one of the members, Mr Harris, in Antill's Lane, which became known as Meeting Lane. The first Baptist Chapel was built in 1717 and there was a graveyard and a minister's house.

 

In October 1832, during the pastorate of Rev. Joseph Bromwich, who held the position for 44 years, attention was called to the dilapidated, condition of the Meeting House.  As it was considered useless to attempt any repairs, it was resolved to build a new place of worship on the chapel property, situated in what was known as Charley Way, now Charnwood Road.

 

This chapel was opened on 7th May 1834.  Towards the total cost of £630, no less than £240 was raised in Shepshed alone.  At first, trouble arose through the introduction of musical instruments, but subsequently the prejudice died down and a choir was formed.

 

Rev. T. Rhys Evans, of Countesthorpe, took over the pastorate in 1871, and remained until 1890.  Three years after he came, in 1874, a new baptistery was erected in the chapel, the custom hitherto being to use the village brook for baptisms, and floodgates were used to dam it for the administration of the rite.  The brook still runs at the bottom of the chapel yard.  The baptistery is situated in the centre of the platform under the pulpit.

 

In 1866 an organ was obtained for public worship and in 1877 galleries were erected in the chapel at a cost of upwards of £450, the greater part of which was raised before the re-opening services.  A few years on, the ground adjoining the chapel, was purchased at a cost of about £400.

 

Rev. E. M. Andrews succeeded as pastor of the church in 1890 and in 1893 the Bi-centenary of the church was celebrated. In the meantime considerable alterations and improvements were made in the interior of the chapel, and new schoolrooms had been put up at a cost of £1,000.

 

The Rev. A. E. Pope undertook the charge in 1908. For a considerable time the question of removing the old straight back seats in the chapel and replacing them with some of a modern type had been considered, and the scheme was taken up in real earnest shortly after that.

The church has its own website at http://www.crbcshepshed.org.uk/welcome.htm and a lot of the photography featured on it has come from me, and I am also building up a photo archive of the church's activities for future worshipers to look at in years to come.

 

Charnwood Road Baptist Church, Shepshed

On Sundays Maureen and I generally go to this church if possible.  Maureen has been going for the twenty years we have lived here and is now a Deacon. I started attending more frequently a few years ago.  It is a delightful little Baptist Chapel and the following tells you a bit more about it:

The church was founded in 1693 and now in 2009 will be 316 years old.  It has been at its present location in Charnwood Road since 7th May 1834 when the new chapel building was opened.

 

There were Baptists in the Shepshed and Rempstone areas and in 1693 they joined together and for a time the community met for worship in the front parlour of one of the members, Mr Harris, in Antill's Lane, which became known as Meeting Lane. The first Baptist Chapel was built in 1717 and there was a graveyard and a minister's house.

 

In October 1832, during the pastorate of Rev. Joseph Bromwich, who held the position for 44 years, attention was called to the dilapidated, condition of the Meeting House.  As it was considered useless to attempt any repairs, it was resolved to build a new place of worship on the chapel property, situated in what was known as Charley Way, now Charnwood Road.

 

This chapel was opened on 7th May 1834.  Towards the total cost of £630, no less than £240 was raised in Shepshed alone.  At first, trouble arose through the introduction of musical instruments, but subsequently the prejudice died down and a choir was formed.

 

Rev. T. Rhys Evans, of Countesthorpe, took over the pastorate in 1871, and remained until 1890.  Three years after he came, in 1874, a new baptistery was erected in the chapel, the custom hitherto being to use the village brook for baptisms, and floodgates were used to dam it for the administration of the rite.  The brook still runs at the bottom of the chapel yard.  The baptistery is situated in the centre of the platform under the pulpit.

 

In 1866 an organ was obtained for public worship and in 1877 galleries were erected in the chapel at a cost of upwards of £450, the greater part of which was raised before the re-opening services.  A few years on, the ground adjoining the chapel, was purchased at a cost of about £400.

 

Rev. E. M. Andrews succeeded as pastor of the church in 1890 and in 1893 the Bi-centenary of the church was celebrated. In the meantime considerable alterations and improvements were made in the interior of the chapel, and new schoolrooms had been put up at a cost of £1,000.

 

The Rev. A. E. Pope undertook the charge in 1908. For a considerable time the question of removing the old straight back seats in the chapel and replacing them with some of a modern type had been considered, and the scheme was taken up in real earnest shortly after that.

The church has its own website at http://www.crbcshepshed.org.uk/welcome.htm and a lot of the photography featured on it has come from me, and I am also building up a photo archive of the church's activities for future worshipers to look at in years to come.

 

comments (16)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 13 Nov 2009, 01:33
Well it's really nice to see the building used for its proper purpose Brian
Brian Walbey: This is only a small part of the building Chris, behind, and above are lots more rooms and a big hall upstairs.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 13 Nov 2009, 01:53
Not a bad interior for a sheepshed, Brian...must be a lot of pampered sheep in your parts.

Good collection of brass pipes up in the balcony, too...they'd bring a tidy sum if yer could get yer 'ands on 'em fer scrap.

Seriously...its a fine montage, Brian, and rich with warm colours.
Brian Walbey: Lol. Thanks Ray. Sadly the organ is not electrically safe to use any more, and will cost a lot to refurbish, so they are going to keep the pipes you refer to and remove all the workings behind.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 13 Nov 2009, 03:05
very ggod montage Brian, you have done justice to your church
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Tony.
a wonderful building Brian...I will read the history later when I've got more time
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill, it is a fascinating history, especially when it comes down to the costs involved compared with nowadays.
Not another place to put on my list of 'must see'. I have always be intuiged by the name Shepshed.
Brian Walbey: It is a great little chapel Chad in all respects, and if you are interested to know more about the name Shepshed have a quick look here http://www.shepshed.org/
You've done a wonderful montage Brian!
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Richard.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 13 Nov 2009, 12:26
Great montage Brian I think the out side dose not look much like a church,good looking building but
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much vintage.
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 13 Nov 2009, 13:27
They are so lucky to have you as their church photographer, Brian. You would never know from the outside, however, how delightfully warm and inviting it is on the inside!
Brian Walbey: It is a very warm inviting church, not only as a building Ginnie, but for its Minister and all the lovely people in it, some of whom have been attending here since they were in the Sunday School up to 70 or more years ago.
It really looks quite modern Brian...but very nice and inviting. I'm happy for you and Maureen. Lovely pictures.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ron, it is a lovely little chapel and a nice place to attend.
The outside does not give the impression, that it would look like this inside, lovely chapel.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Linda, I have done a lot of photography in here, and even put an Audio/visual together of it as well.
Nice bright and colourful interior Brian. What sort of size is the congregation?
Brian Walbey: It is nice and bright Janet, not just in its appearance but in its worship as well. I suppose on a good Sunday there might be 50 - 60 in the morning but slightly less in the evening as quite a few of the congregation are getting on in years. There is also a Methodist chapel, another Baptist chapel, Anglian and Catholic Churches, a Bethesda Chapel and an Evangelical Church in Shepshed so church attendees are well spread out among them all.
Looks to be a thriving place Brian. Wish they'd make the cushions behave ;-)... richard
Brian Walbey: Lol re the cushions Richard, at least they are more comfortable than the ones they replaced. It is quite a thriving church in all respects.
  • Ellie
  • England
  • 13 Nov 2009, 20:08
This is a very nice set of pictures Brian, they give a sense of your involvement too - there's more to them than ' a picture' if you understand what I mean
Brian Walbey: I do know what you mean Ellie, it is a very "live" church which all stems from having an excellent Minister at the moment.
  • Aussie
  • Australia
  • 13 Nov 2009, 21:32
Lovely images Brian and an interesting history. It's always surprising to read some of the amounts that have been raised for church building works.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Aussie. It is amazing to compare what one could get these days for the sums of money they spent all those years ago building places like this.
Fabulous. Nice commentary also.
I can hear the singing!
Cheers
Rob
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Rob, the sining was good yesterday i can confirm smile
i love what you have done here, im sure you could sell it to the church to use as postcards! :O)
Brian Walbey: I have printed some enprints off and my wife has mounted them up as gift cards for our little sales table in the church already Ryan. Thanks for your comment.

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