brianaw

25 Feb 2018 110 views
 
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photoblog image Donington Aeropark 7/7

Donington Aeropark 7/7

The Blackburn Buccaneer was a British carrier-borne attack aircraft designed in the 1950’s for the Royal Navy (RN). Designed and initially produced by Blackburn Aircraft at Brough, it was later officially known as the Hawker Siddeley Buccaneer when Blackburn became a part of the Hawker Siddeley Group, but this name is rarely used. Delivered to the Royal Navy in September 1967, XV350 went on serve with the MoD (Procurement Executive) and then the A&AEE at Boscombe Down from 1969, performing trials work on the Matra rocket pods that later became a standard RAF weapon. She continued weapons trials work from then on, on projects such as the Pave Spike laser designator pod, Paveway 1,000lb Laser Guided Bombs and Sea Eagle missiles. She had several visits to the USA during her trials career, being named 'Tequila Sheila' on a 1980 visit to the U.S. Naval Air Test Center at Patuxent River in Maryland. She was finally retired on 28th April 1993, having worn these early camouflage colours throughout.  A short video below of a take-off, look how quickly the pilot got the undercarriage up:

 

                              

Donington Aeropark 7/7

The Blackburn Buccaneer was a British carrier-borne attack aircraft designed in the 1950’s for the Royal Navy (RN). Designed and initially produced by Blackburn Aircraft at Brough, it was later officially known as the Hawker Siddeley Buccaneer when Blackburn became a part of the Hawker Siddeley Group, but this name is rarely used. Delivered to the Royal Navy in September 1967, XV350 went on serve with the MoD (Procurement Executive) and then the A&AEE at Boscombe Down from 1969, performing trials work on the Matra rocket pods that later became a standard RAF weapon. She continued weapons trials work from then on, on projects such as the Pave Spike laser designator pod, Paveway 1,000lb Laser Guided Bombs and Sea Eagle missiles. She had several visits to the USA during her trials career, being named 'Tequila Sheila' on a 1980 visit to the U.S. Naval Air Test Center at Patuxent River in Maryland. She was finally retired on 28th April 1993, having worn these early camouflage colours throughout.  A short video below of a take-off, look how quickly the pilot got the undercarriage up:

 

                              

comments (7)

  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 25 Feb 2018, 00:37
Gotta love those folding wings, Brian...someone has been observing birds.
Brian Walbey: The folding wings meant more could be stored inside and on the deck of aircraft carriers.
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 25 Feb 2018, 06:55
I think I remember seeing these on the decks of warships with their wings folded
Brian Walbey: The folding wings meant more could be stored inside and on the deck of aircraft carriers.
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 25 Feb 2018, 14:34
Interesting wing structure!
Brian Walbey: The folding wings meant more could be stored inside and on the deck of aircraft carriers.
i always wondered fhow solig the wings would be when they are folded back out Brian....petersmile
Brian Walbey: I suppose there's all sorts of technical kit inside those hollow wings.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 25 Feb 2018, 16:54
Another favourite. I had an Airfix model of it and and I was always impressed with the folding wings.
Brian Walbey: I remember seeing them at a couple of airshows, another very fine plane I always thought.
A great looking aircraft!
Brian Walbey: One of my favourites from that time.
Of course it took courage to land with such a monster on the deck of an aircraft carrier
Brian Walbey: I guess it still does Claudio, not something I'd ever choose to do.

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