brianaw

02 May 2017 190 views
 
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photoblog image Easton Walled Garden 2/10

Easton Walled Garden 2/10

In the early 1900s, the future US President Franklin D. Roosevelt described Easton as "a dream of Nirvana……almost too good to be true". The 20th century was brutal to many Estates and their families. World War I claimed the lives of six Cholmeleys and in World War II Easton Hall was requisitioned by the army and demolished shortly afterwards.

Easton Walled Garden 2/10

In the early 1900s, the future US President Franklin D. Roosevelt described Easton as "a dream of Nirvana……almost too good to be true". The 20th century was brutal to many Estates and their families. World War I claimed the lives of six Cholmeleys and in World War II Easton Hall was requisitioned by the army and demolished shortly afterwards.

comments (12)

Jolie présentation de ce beau jardin.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Martine.
  • Ray
  • Not in United States
  • 2 May 2017, 02:22
Makes me think "Tree Henge", Brian.
Brian Walbey: I see what you mean.
An interesting little pathway!
"War is hell"
Brian Walbey: Unfortunately our forces took over a lot of country houses during the war and left many of them in a very bad state!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 2 May 2017, 06:38
This is a tale of sadness then Brian
Brian Walbey: Unfortunately our forces took over a lot of country houses during the war and left many of them in a very bad state as you probably know!
Nothing but a bunch of vandals Brian.
Brian Walbey: Unfortunately our forces took over a lot of country houses during the war and left many of them in a very bad state as you probably know!
Strange to have some grass mowed but some not.
Brian Walbey: I seem to recall it was some sort of design.
A bit unkind to borrow the house and knock it down Brian
Brian Walbey: Unfortunately our forces took over a lot of country houses during the war and left many of them in a very bad state as you probably know!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 2 May 2017, 16:31
a very formal, French garden! Why was Easton Hall demolished - by German bombs?
Brian Walbey: I found this Philine that might interest you. According to the architectural historian, John Martin Robinson, ‘nearly every house which was used to accommodate the military has some horror story to retell of staircases chopped up for firewood, subsidiary wings gutted, the Van Dycks used as dartboards, jeeps driven through wrought iron gates or stone balustrades, carved or painted graffiti, smashed windows and much else besides.’

Easton Hall suffered all this and much more. The fabric of the house was damaged, contents ravaged and family records destroyed forever. Stories abound of live ammunition being fired inside the house and hand grenades thrown into the greenhouses.

The Cholmeleys never returned to Easton. After the war, the house, scarred and broken, waited empty for the next six years. Like all unoccupied properties it suffered to vandals and thieves who stole the lead from the roof. No longer watertight, no longer habitable, the house had become a burden for the family.

It would have been with heart-wrenching sorrow that Sir Hugh chose the only viable option. In 1951 he made the decision to demolish Easton Hall.

Stone by stone, tile by tile, the house was raised to the ground. Memories from generations of the Cholmeley family were obliterated in a just a few days. When the demolition people had gone only a few foundation walls and steps remained.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 2 May 2017, 16:49
The Armed Forces used many country houses during the war, You would have thought that a grateful government would have restored them to their former glory but of course finances were dire at the time. The gardener has not been very uniform with his topiary, has he?
Brian Walbey: I found this today Alan. According to the architectural historian, John Martin Robinson, ‘nearly every house which was used to accommodate the military has some horror story to retell of staircases chopped up for firewood, subsidiary wings gutted, the Van Dycks used as dartboards, jeeps driven through wrought iron gates or stone balustrades, carved or painted graffiti, smashed windows and much else besides.’

Easton Hall suffered all this and much more. The fabric of the house was damaged, contents ravaged and family records destroyed forever. Stories abound of live ammunition being fired inside the house and hand grenades thrown into the greenhouses.

The Cholmeleys never returned to Easton. After the war, the house, scarred and broken, waited empty for the next six years. Like all unoccupied properties it suffered to vandals and thieves who stole the lead from the roof. No longer watertight, no longer habitable, the house had become a burden for the family.

It would have been with heart-wrenching sorrow that Sir Hugh chose the only viable option. In 1951 he made the decision to demolish Easton Hall.

Stone by stone, tile by tile, the house was raised to the ground. Memories from generations of the Cholmeley family were obliterated in a just a few days. When the demolition people had gone only a few foundation walls and steps remained.
it's a shame to see such destruction of a special garden Brian...
a good photojournalist touch....petersmile
Brian Walbey: I found this Peter. According to the architectural historian, John Martin Robinson, ‘nearly every house which was used to accommodate the military has some horror story to retell of staircases chopped up for firewood, subsidiary wings gutted, the Van Dycks used as dartboards, jeeps driven through wrought iron gates or stone balustrades, carved or painted graffiti, smashed windows and much else besides.’

Easton Hall suffered all this and much more. The fabric of the house was damaged, contents ravaged and family records destroyed forever. Stories abound of live ammunition being fired inside the house and hand grenades thrown into the greenhouses.

The Cholmeleys never returned to Easton. After the war, the house, scarred and broken, waited empty for the next six years. Like all unoccupied properties it suffered to vandals and thieves who stole the lead from the roof. No longer watertight, no longer habitable, the house had become a burden for the family.

It would have been with heart-wrenching sorrow that Sir Hugh chose the only viable option. In 1951 he made the decision to demolish Easton Hall.

Stone by stone, tile by tile, the house was raised to the ground. Memories from generations of the Cholmeley family were obliterated in a just a few days. When the demolition people had gone only a few foundation walls and steps remained.
Looks like fairly recent plantings.
Brian Walbey: Yes they can't be more than just a few years old.
  • Lisl
  • Bath, England
  • 3 May 2017, 06:24
The trees in the far garden may have grown larger than planned originially?
Brian Walbey: In the walled garden at the back of the picture there is a wide path between those tall trees in the centre.

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