brianaw

07 Mar 2016 140 views
 
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photoblog image Crich Museum - The Wood Carvings 1/5

Crich Museum - The Wood Carvings 1/5

We paid another visit to Crich Tramway Museum last year but this time I took a greater mix of photos rather than just concentrating on the trams. This week the wood carvings in the Woodland Walk starting with the Green Man. The origins of the green man are lost in time and the folklore surrounding him goes back thousands of years. His foliate face peers down from buildings throughout the world and he has been the subject of much research. He is known by countless different names: Jack in the Green, Robin Hood, the King of the May, John Barleycorn and many others to many people all over the world.

Throughout history, by whichever name he is called, the Green Man represents the cycle of death to the birth of new life, the death of winter and the coming of spring; he is the caretaker of nature. The Green Man could be described as the male equivalent or partner to the female Mother Nature; the protector of the earth, the fertility of spring. It is only through his death in winter that there can be rebirth in the summer.

There is a gentleman who lives just outside Bath who would, I'm sure, love to have this in his garden, or perhaps he would enjoy having a monochrome Green Man instead like the one below 

 

                        

Crich Museum - The Wood Carvings 1/5

We paid another visit to Crich Tramway Museum last year but this time I took a greater mix of photos rather than just concentrating on the trams. This week the wood carvings in the Woodland Walk starting with the Green Man. The origins of the green man are lost in time and the folklore surrounding him goes back thousands of years. His foliate face peers down from buildings throughout the world and he has been the subject of much research. He is known by countless different names: Jack in the Green, Robin Hood, the King of the May, John Barleycorn and many others to many people all over the world.

Throughout history, by whichever name he is called, the Green Man represents the cycle of death to the birth of new life, the death of winter and the coming of spring; he is the caretaker of nature. The Green Man could be described as the male equivalent or partner to the female Mother Nature; the protector of the earth, the fertility of spring. It is only through his death in winter that there can be rebirth in the summer.

There is a gentleman who lives just outside Bath who would, I'm sure, love to have this in his garden, or perhaps he would enjoy having a monochrome Green Man instead like the one below 

 

                        

comments (17)

This one is really something! It looks several feet high. Nice photos, Brian!
Brian Walbey: Yes it is quite tall and a very fine carving.
Je trouve très impressionnante cette statue en bois.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Martine.
This carving is just amazing Brian!
Brian Walbey: Very well done isn't it.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 7 Mar 2016, 06:40
This is a thing of great skill & beauty Brian, a wonderful carving
Brian Walbey: I thought you would like, this Chris.
It could almost be the head of Jupiter Brian.
Brian Walbey: On second looks yes it could be.
  • Lisl
  • Bath, England
  • 7 Mar 2016, 06:59
The "gentleman in Bath" and I set out to find all the Green Men in Somerset. It was a huge task and overwhelmed us, but we found over 40, Brian
Brian Walbey: I will admit to not being aware of these things until I joined SC and Chris came up with some pictures of his own.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 7 Mar 2016, 06:59
This is so beautiful. Some gifted artist did a great job here. Love the two pictures. The B&W is fabulous.
I hope that you are feeling better.
Brian Walbey: Yes some very fine wood carving. I am better than I was and am waiting for my replacement glasses with the hope that being able to see properly will sort things out.
He looks life-sized, Brian, and the perfect entrance to any nature walk. WOW. I especially like all your info on the Green Man....
Brian Walbey: Yes it is quite tall Ginnie. I didn't know about these things until I joined SC and saw some of Chris's postings of them.
It is a beautiful carving Brian. I recall seeing some of these when I was last at Crich but not this one
Brian Walbey: Yes a fine bit of work. Perhaps you will remember the other 4 in this series.
Black and white suits the green man but I love the top shot as it shows the rough trails. I prefer rough trails, oddly enough.
Brian Walbey: Perhaps I should try and do a mix of the two images, B.& W.for the carving and colour for the rest, that would certainly test my abilities!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 7 Mar 2016, 11:35
There is a gentleman in Pretoria with a garden too ... smile

Both pictures are excellent, with the mono as my favourite.
Brian Walbey: Your neighbours would certainly wonder what on earth you'd got in your garden Louis smile
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 7 Mar 2016, 13:39
I thought it was Sir Tiff immortalised in wood for all to see for years to come smile I never realised that the Green man and John Barleycord were one of the same. I never knew about the woodland walk, either; I've always ignored any information and gone straight for the trams smile
Brian Walbey: I thought this would appeal to Chris. We've never done the Woodland Walk before, it's quite pleasant.
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 7 Mar 2016, 14:15
What lovely images Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Anne.
Nice treatment of this piece I saw this when we visited a few years back
Brian Walbey: Thanks Martin, a fine piece of wood sculpture isn't it.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 7 Mar 2016, 19:52
Yes, my first thought was the man outside Bath - the black and white picture could be an illustration in a story book about Rübezahl, a Silesian bearded man who lives in the wood.
Brian Walbey: I'm not familiar with that story but by the title this might indeed fit the bill, as we say over here.
A wonderful bit of wood-carving!
Brian Walbey: Very well done isn't it.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 17 Mar 2016, 07:39
What a fine specimen!

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camera Olympus E-450
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/40s
aperture f/4.6
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 23.0mm
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