brianaw

24 Feb 2015 266 views
 
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photoblog image Wisbech 2/7

Wisbech 2/7

Although we’d gone to Wisbech to visit Peckover House I really liked this group of period style houses built in 1861 on the north bank of the River Nene just off the centre of town. Might I be right in thinking they have a sort of Flemish style to them?

Wisbech 2/7

Although we’d gone to Wisbech to visit Peckover House I really liked this group of period style houses built in 1861 on the north bank of the River Nene just off the centre of town. Might I be right in thinking they have a sort of Flemish style to them?

comments (22)

Could be, or a bit Dutch? Rather handsome though whatever the influence
Brian Walbey: The general consensus seems to be a Dutch influence Bill, wasn't there a time when this area of England was called New Holland?
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 24 Feb 2015, 00:12
I like those...sort of...faux battlements on the roof, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It's generally thought today that they are of a Dutch influence.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 24 Feb 2015, 04:50
You are right about the style, it could be Flemish of Dutch.
Love the angle and the green.
Looks very sophisticated....
Brian Walbey: Nice looking houses aren't they, I do believe, at one time many years back, this area of England was referred to as New Holland.
What a beautiful Dutch frontage Brian!
Brian Walbey: Yes it is Richard, sadly there wasn't room to get further back to take a better angle.
This is a wonderful composition of these great old row houses Brian... i like the delightful facades up to the roofs....petersmile
Brian Walbey: Thanks Peter, the general view is that they are a Dutch design.
Good pov for the pointy tops of the building.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Jacquelyn, there wasn't room to get any further back for a better angle.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 24 Feb 2015, 07:06
Indeed those stepped gables do bring northern Europe to mind
Brian Walbey: The general view is of a Dutch style Chris, Astrid and Philine agree, so that's good enough for me.
  • Lisl
  • Batheaston
  • 24 Feb 2015, 07:34
This is known as a crow-stepped gable, Brian. They were common in various parts of Europe, but I don't know if they were particularly Flemish. Perhaps someone else will know?
Brian Walbey: Thanks Lisl. Astrid and Philine say Dutch so I won't argue with their superior knowledge.
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 24 Feb 2015, 07:50
Actually Wisbeach has some rather fine buildings particularly along the river frontage. It was important in the past for ship trading and thingies.
Brian Walbey: Yes I was quite impressed with the old buildings round the centre, the usual 20th.21st.century gubbins round the outskirts though!!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 24 Feb 2015, 07:51
Dutch style, indeed - but very English with the bay windows and foreyards, too. I like that the foreyards are not replaced by parking places as I recently often saw in England. There are some relationships between NL and England, esp. in East Anglia.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Philine, Astrid also thinks they are Dutch in style so Dutch it will be. There is a town a bit further north called New Holland and i do recall that many years ago some of this area of England was also called that.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 24 Feb 2015, 08:09
Certainly those gable ends have a Dutch influence
Brian Walbey: Astrid and Philine say so, I won't argue with their superior knowledge Mike.
  • gutteridge
  • Where altitude and attitude meet
  • 24 Feb 2015, 09:04
Delightful Brian, Norfolk meets Scotland.
Brian Walbey: More like east Anglia meets Hollandland Chad.
such lovely houses
Brian Walbey: Very nice aren't they.
Looks very neat and tidy.
Brian Walbey: The whole street does Mary, it is lined with very old houses.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 24 Feb 2015, 13:16
"During the seventeenth century another influx of people came to the Fens. Either they were Scottish or Dutch prisoners or the Huguenots who were seeking asylum from the Protestant persecutions in mainland Europe. ..The Huguenots were French or Flemish Protestants who fled the religious persecution of Louis XIV. many seek asylum in England. Some of the Huguenots were given asylum by the Earl of Bedford and settled in the Fens around Whittlesey, Eye and Thorney from the 1650's. Some of the Huguenots who had settled first at Sandtoft in the Isle of Axeholme in northern Lincolnshire, also relocated to the Fens from the 1680's. In 1652 the Huguenots started holding a French congregation at Thorney. Large numbers of them rallied to the call of Cornelius Vermudian after the first Civil War in the drainage of the Fens."
Brian Walbey: Thanks for this Philine, it is very interesting, I don't think the history of any country, especially those in Europe, is really very straight forward with the continual movement of peoples from one place to another over the centuries.
looks like some interesting history here Brian. They are unusual for England aren't they
Brian Walbey: Yes they definitely seem to have some Dutch influence in their design. There is a town a bit further north called New Holland and i do recall that many years ago some of this area of England was also called that.
you may have a point now that you mention it, but it is unusual for a person of my geographical area. great shot nevertheless
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ayush, they definitely have a Dutch appearance according to Astrid and Philine.
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 24 Feb 2015, 15:34
Whatever their style, they are rather magnificent
Brian Walbey: Astrid and Philine say so, I won't argue with their superior knowledge Anne that they are Dutch in style.
I don't know the style Brian, but they are handsome houses.
Brian Walbey: Astrid and Philine say so, I won't argue with their superior knowledge Frank that they are Dutch in style.
Well adjusted Brian. Very distinctive houses.
Brian Walbey: Thanks John.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 24 Feb 2015, 20:04
"Sir Cornelius Wasterdyk Vermuyden (Sint-Maartensdijk, 1595 – London, 11 October 1677)[1] was a Dutch engineer who introduced Dutch land reclamation methods to England. Commissioned by the Crown to drain Hatfield Chase in the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, Vermuyden was knighted in 1629 for his work and became an English citizen in 1633.

In the 1650s, he directed major projects to drain The Fens of East Anglia, introducing the innovation of constructing washes, to allow periodic flooding of the area by excess waters. An unintended consequence was the shrinking of peat as it dried, resulting in a drop of land levels below the rivers and drains, and renewed seasonal flooding. This could not be controlled until the development of steam-powered pumps in the 19th century used to pump out water, and construction of additional water control projects in the 1960s. At Ramsey Forty Foot on the Forty Foot Drain there is a very good example of a wind-powered, steam-powered and diesel-powered pump sitting side by side. At Prickwillow a museum has a very large pumping engine in working order, but not actively used. The Norfolk Broads were mostly created by the extraction of peat because of this drainage."
I remember to have heard this story from our English guide when we visited the Fens, esp. the Ely Cathedral.
Brian Walbey: Thanks for all this Philine, most interesting. When we lived at St.Ives, near Cambridge and Ely we used to go out in the Ramsey area and drove along by the Forty Foot Drain. It is a bit daunting as the road is above the water with no fencing at all, indeed in the winter there are often accidents on the icy roads and cars ending up in the dyke and the occupants drowning, mainly at night when the only lighting is from the cars headlamps. We always used to try and visit Ely at least once a year and sometimes more, one could never get tired of visiting the wonderful cathedral. It all seems a long time ago now, we moved away to the Midlands in 1989.
It was known just as Holland in Anglo Saxon times, too. Very nice houses - they definitely have a Dutch look to them.
Brian Walbey: I thought I'd seen the Holland reference somewhere in my past, Philine has sent me a load of information I'm about to read about the Dutch influence in the Wisbech area.

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