brianaw

07 Mar 2014 160 views
 
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photoblog image From The Scanner - Horizontal Style 12/14

From The Scanner - Horizontal Style 12/14

BLYTHEBURGH CHURCH

We’ve had several holidays in Suffolk, that delightful county in Eastern England where Richard Trim took up residence last year, when our children were younger and we still lived in Cambridgeshire. We went past this beautiful church several times and one day we stopped to have a good look at it. Holy Trinity Church, Blythburgh is a Grade I listed parish church and has stood in Blythburgh for a thousand years. It is a magnificent building which can be seen rising out from the Blyth estuary – sometimes affectionately called ‘The Cathedral of the Marshes’. The Domesday Book shows Blythburgh as a royal burgh and having one of the richest churches in Suffolk. The Prior of an adjacent Augustinian house was granted the right to build a new church - the one we see today - in 1412. Blythburgh did not enjoy good fortune. The Dissolution of the Monasteries left the church without the support of a priory. The Civil War led to some of the “idolatrous” images being removed from the church, although it seems to have been spared gratuitous destruction. There followed 200 years of neglect and decay, culminating in closure for safety reasons for a short period in th 19th.century.. Only in 1881 was a restoration fund started and Blythburgh could begin its long road back to the magnificent structure we see today.

 

From The Scanner - Horizontal Style 12/14

BLYTHEBURGH CHURCH

We’ve had several holidays in Suffolk, that delightful county in Eastern England where Richard Trim took up residence last year, when our children were younger and we still lived in Cambridgeshire. We went past this beautiful church several times and one day we stopped to have a good look at it. Holy Trinity Church, Blythburgh is a Grade I listed parish church and has stood in Blythburgh for a thousand years. It is a magnificent building which can be seen rising out from the Blyth estuary – sometimes affectionately called ‘The Cathedral of the Marshes’. The Domesday Book shows Blythburgh as a royal burgh and having one of the richest churches in Suffolk. The Prior of an adjacent Augustinian house was granted the right to build a new church - the one we see today - in 1412. Blythburgh did not enjoy good fortune. The Dissolution of the Monasteries left the church without the support of a priory. The Civil War led to some of the “idolatrous” images being removed from the church, although it seems to have been spared gratuitous destruction. There followed 200 years of neglect and decay, culminating in closure for safety reasons for a short period in th 19th.century.. Only in 1881 was a restoration fund started and Blythburgh could begin its long road back to the magnificent structure we see today.

 

comments (18)

  • Ray
  • Singapore, Singapore
  • 7 Mar 2014, 00:27
Is this ole Trimmo's house, Brian...no wonder he is always in a bad mood?
Brian Walbey: Somehow I don't think so Ray smile but I'd bet anything he is very familiar with this church, it is only a few miles from where he lives.
Looks like the only way you could've fit this in the frame!!
Brian Walbey: yes it's not an easy church to photograph if I recall, it is quite long and there are not many good vantage points. It is nice inside and with all those windows very light and airy.
Framed nicely ...cracking photo
Brian Walbey: Thanks Shane, photographic vantage points aren't easily found at this church.
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 7 Mar 2014, 06:09
I know Suffolk has some very fine Churches, and this must be one of the best
Brian Walbey: Yes it is a fine church and with all those windows very light and airy inside.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 7 Mar 2014, 06:48
Wonderful isn't it Brian, I have been there myself. I am surprised to learn it was closed for a while in the 19th century
Brian Walbey: Then you know what a lovely building it is, and with all those windows very light and airy inside.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 7 Mar 2014, 07:27
A thousand years. Only a European would understand that kind of age/antiquity, Brian. We Americans stand with our lower jaw on the ground!
Brian Walbey: I guess it must seem strange that we in Europe have so many years of history in our buildings compared with the USA., but you have so much we enjoy, ie.what Elizabeth and Frank have been showing us recently. This church is only a short drive away from the country estate of Lord Richard Trim.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 7 Mar 2014, 08:08
I don't know Suffolk well at all - this is impressive!
Brian Walbey: Yes a very fine church Mike and only a few miles from the home of the much worshipped Lord Trim of Suffolk.
old times relive
Brian Walbey: Indeed Chantal, I have so many slides from years ago I just feel like sharing the best of them.
Rising out of an estuary appeals to me. I like it's nickname too.
Brian Walbey: I'm pretty certain you would enjoy seeing this church as described Mary, this link is for somebody else's image taken from a distance https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=blythburgh+church&espv=210&es_sm=122&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=GKoZU-P-OdSThgfUjoCwCA&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAg&biw=1280&bih=899&dpr=1#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=eXG0VqyTA5xjKM%253A%3BuK0SC90VZ3wRzM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fstatic.panoramio.com%252Fphotos%252Flarge%252F3358535.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.panoramio.com%252Fphoto%252F3358535%3B800%3B601
Great shot Brian smile I imagine it's still well kept; I see one of the windows is boarded up here.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Martin. It was very clean and smart when we went, although being way back in the 70's.probably that window might have been dealt with by now I suppose.
A fine looking church Brian. Good idea to give it an airing
Brian Walbey: Yes isn't it a lovely building Janet. Thanks for your comment.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 7 Mar 2014, 12:16
What a huge church - and inside there must be a flood of heavenly light! Why was one big window closed by brick stones?
I would like to visit Suffolk one day. But
Brian Walbey: I don't know why the window was boarded up, it was many years ago so it might be normal by now. With all those windows this is a very light and airy church, ideal for photos inside.
What a long & interesting history it has, Brian. So different from our places of worship. Good you were able to capture the whole building in this rather close-up shot.
Brian Walbey: Yes it's not the easiest of churches to get a good shot of from the outside. Ginnie said much the same as you about its long history, Canada and the USA.are much about the same where longevity of history is concerned I suppose.
THis is amazing Brian!
Brian Walbey: Yes a very fine church Ronke, outside and inside.
A handsome church Brian.
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Bill, well worth a visit should you ever pass that way.
A wonderful Church Brian!
Very nicely framed.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard, it is a very fine church, and with all those windows very light and airy inside.
Fine building!
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Tom, well worth a visit should you ever pass that way.
It's a magnificent building, Brian, even by East Anglian church standards, and in a spectacular location. Did you come across "Black Shuck"?
Brian Walbey: A church well worth a visit should you venture that way Graeme. I had to Google Black Shuck, no we didn't see it smile

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