brianaw

28 Nov 2013 553 views
 
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photoblog image Bradgate Spring #1

Bradgate Spring #1

Two more pictures today and tomorrow taken with the little Fujifilm Finepix JX320 in Bradgate Park, Leicestershire during early May. I was very impressed by this lovely outcrop of Precambrian rocks on the side of the hill as one walks in to this 850 acre park.

Bradgate Spring #1

Two more pictures today and tomorrow taken with the little Fujifilm Finepix JX320 in Bradgate Park, Leicestershire during early May. I was very impressed by this lovely outcrop of Precambrian rocks on the side of the hill as one walks in to this 850 acre park.

comments (15)

That is a great rock outcrop - I like the way you've framed it!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Elizabeth, our whole area is littered with outcrops like this, many of them a great deal bigger.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 28 Nov 2013, 04:03
Hmmmm!

In what ways do they differ from Postcambrian rocks, Brian?
Brian Walbey: They are older smile
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 28 Nov 2013, 05:40
A very refreshing picture, Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Lisl.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 28 Nov 2013, 06:25
Those rocks must be of a great age Brian
Brian Walbey: Lots of millions I think Chris, some of the Earth's earliest rocks I believe.
  • Gutteridge
  • Where latitude and attitude meet
  • 28 Nov 2013, 07:12
They are just the tip of the iceberg Brian.
Brian Walbey: Indeed Chad, the whole area is made up of a layer of these very old rocks.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 28 Nov 2013, 12:56
an interesting rocky place - finely photographed - you must have almost crawled on the ground.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Philine, the ground dropped away a bit so I didn't have to bend too far down to take this.
what a beautiful view Brian!
Brian Walbey: Yes isn't it just, and only a short drive from our home.
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 28 Nov 2013, 16:32
Those rocks are seriously rock hard rocks ...
Brian Walbey: I'm sure you've walked over and round them many times over the years Richard.
The Precambrian (or Pre-Cambrian) is an interval of geologic time of roughly 4 billion years, beginning with the formation of Earth around 4500 million years ago (mya) and continuing until the abrupt appearance in the fossil record some 542 mya of abundant macroscopic hard-shelled animals. That event marks the beginning of the Cambrian period.

During the vast depths of Precambrian time, the newly-formed planet congealed, cooled, differentiated into solid, liquid, and gaseous parts, and became the site for the origin of microscopic life forms that proliferated and became major participants shaping the planet. Photosynthetic bacteria, in particular, released so much oxygen that it caused the waters' heavy load of dissolved iron to precipitate out as iron oxides (which form today's rich veins of iron ore). As the bacteria continued producing oxygen while levels of iron in the water declined, the oxygen accumulated in the atmosphere, achieving the level needed to support the forms of multicellular life that were developing in the waters—on the foundation of an earlier development from non-nucleated cells (prokaryotes) to nucleated cells (eukaryotes).

The Precambrian is divided, from earliest to most recent, into the Hadean, Archaean (or Archean), and Proterozoic eons. Some scientists recognize only two subdivisions, the Archaean and the Proterozoic eons, beginning the Precambrian from the formation of the earth's crust and the oldest earth rocks 3800-4000 mya. In rock formations dating from the Archaean eon, the first fossil evidence of prokaryotic cells appears about 3500 mya and the first fossil evidence of eukaryotic cells appears about 2700 mya. Red algae, the first known multicelled organism appears about 1200 mya and the earliest known complex multicelled organisms appear in the Ediacaran period, starting at least by 570 mya.
Brian Walbey: Thanks for this Bill, it saved me looking it up, I used to like this subject at school although I've forgotten it all now.
PS

Nice picture
Brian Walbey: Thanks again.
Superb capture of these ancient rocks Brian!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard.
Any fossils in it?
Brian Walbey: I guess there might be although these rocks might even pre-date living organisms, I do know there are some very fine geological things to be found.
It is a nice outcrop of Precambrian rocks Brian... in eastern Canada the Precambrian Shield is a very dominant mountain range....petersmile
Brian Walbey: The whole of the area we call Charnwood, which I believe I've mentioned before, that is just south of us is all rocks of this type, some of the oldest in the U.K.
nice pano, looking good with the inclusion of the rocks Brian. i will have to look up precambrian though
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ayush. If you look at Bill Phillips comment on this image he has been kind enough (?) to Google a load of information about precambrian.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 29 Nov 2013, 23:41
Gentle rolling countryside - and the odd rock or two!

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