brianaw

29 Sep 2013 282 views
 
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photoblog image A Look At Lakeland (1 of quite a few)

A Look At Lakeland (1 of quite a few)

KESWICK PARISH CHURCH

On the Wednesday we were in Keswick it was quite dull and wet so that is when I took the opportunity to have a look at the parish church of St.John, just off the town centre. The site for this church was chosen by the founder, John Marshall, Lord of the Manor of Castlerigg and a son of a Leeds linen manufacturer. He was a friend of William Wordsworth who influenced his choice of the position, ensuring that the graceful spire might be seen from miles around. The architect was Anthony Salvin (1799-1881). The material he selected for the outer walls was soft pink sandstone from quarries in the Eden valley but the main structure was of local stone. In 1836 when the building was in its early stages John Marshall died leaving a wife and young son Reginald Dykes Marshall. Mary decided that the plans for the church should be carried forward as a fitting memorial to her husband and she met the whole cost of the building herself, which was £4,000.00. In 1862 the building was enlarged and a north aisle was added by introducing columns and arches to support the roof and moving walls and windows outwards. Twenty years later the south aisle was constructed to match and, in 1889 the present chancel was created by moving the east wall outwards, raising the floor above the level of the nave, and moving the sanctuary and altar on to a higher level. A Lady Chapel was created to the left of the organ and dedicated in 1917. In November 2000 this was altered by using a screen which was formerly between the pulpit and the first pillar separating the nave and the north aisle. The oak screen was erected there in 1894, by John Milburn, a craftsman and Churchwarden 1891-93, in memory of his son Jonathan who died aged 21 in 1892. The wood accurately matched to provide a rear wall for the present chapel and the altar and aumbry were brought forward. Behind this screen a choir vestry was formed.

 

A Look At Lakeland (1 of quite a few)

KESWICK PARISH CHURCH

On the Wednesday we were in Keswick it was quite dull and wet so that is when I took the opportunity to have a look at the parish church of St.John, just off the town centre. The site for this church was chosen by the founder, John Marshall, Lord of the Manor of Castlerigg and a son of a Leeds linen manufacturer. He was a friend of William Wordsworth who influenced his choice of the position, ensuring that the graceful spire might be seen from miles around. The architect was Anthony Salvin (1799-1881). The material he selected for the outer walls was soft pink sandstone from quarries in the Eden valley but the main structure was of local stone. In 1836 when the building was in its early stages John Marshall died leaving a wife and young son Reginald Dykes Marshall. Mary decided that the plans for the church should be carried forward as a fitting memorial to her husband and she met the whole cost of the building herself, which was £4,000.00. In 1862 the building was enlarged and a north aisle was added by introducing columns and arches to support the roof and moving walls and windows outwards. Twenty years later the south aisle was constructed to match and, in 1889 the present chancel was created by moving the east wall outwards, raising the floor above the level of the nave, and moving the sanctuary and altar on to a higher level. A Lady Chapel was created to the left of the organ and dedicated in 1917. In November 2000 this was altered by using a screen which was formerly between the pulpit and the first pillar separating the nave and the north aisle. The oak screen was erected there in 1894, by John Milburn, a craftsman and Churchwarden 1891-93, in memory of his son Jonathan who died aged 21 in 1892. The wood accurately matched to provide a rear wall for the present chapel and the altar and aumbry were brought forward. Behind this screen a choir vestry was formed.

 

comments (9)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 29 Sep 2013, 06:38
Fine images of an interesting looking place Brian
Brian Walbey: Thnaks Chris, it has quite a building history that's for sure.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 29 Sep 2013, 08:23
a very fine collage of this little church - and we really the feel to see all the sides and directions of this gem.
Brian Walbey: It's quite an impressive church for one only started in the 1830's.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 29 Sep 2013, 08:25
Its a rather pleasant arched ceiling, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Yes I like that, a bit unusual.
A fine set of pictures in this collage Brian
Very nicely presented Brian. A good look around this fine church
Looks like an interesting church, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It is Tom considering it wasn't started until the 1830's.
  • elleplate
  • United Kingdom
  • 29 Sep 2013, 17:01
a very balanced collage Brian smile
What a beautiful place Brian! I really like your collage.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 29 Sep 2013, 21:59
The church is a great landmark for me. I've got some external photos but I've never been in. Your images show me what I've missed and gives me an idea for for next visit in May next year.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Alan. It is worth a short visit inside, especially as it was only started in the 1830's and has quite a busy building history.

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