brianaw

17 Apr 2013 94 views
 
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photoblog image Shugborough Miscellany 3/7

Shugborough Miscellany 3/7

The Shugborough estate was owned by the Bishops of Lichfield until the Dissolution of the Monasteries around 1540 and therefter passed through several hands until it was purchased in 1624 by William Anson, a lawyer, of Dunston, Staffordshire. In about 1693 his grandson William Anson demolished the old house and created a new mansion.. The entrance front then to the west, comprised a balustraded three-storey, seven-bayed central block. In about 1748 his great grandson Thomas Anson commissioned architect Thomas Wright to remodel the house, which was extended with flanking two-storey, three-bayed pavilions linked to the central block by pedimented passages. At the turn of the 18th century the house was further altered and extended by architect Samuel Wyatt, when the pavilions and passages were incorporated into the main building and a new porticoed entrance front with ten Doric order pillars was created at the east for Thomas Anson, the 1st Viscount Anson and his wife Anne Margaret Coke. Like Monday’s image of the front of Shugborough Hall the back doesn’t look particularly artistic in design either, in my opinion, although there are some fine shrubs and lawns.

 

Shugborough Miscellany 3/7

The Shugborough estate was owned by the Bishops of Lichfield until the Dissolution of the Monasteries around 1540 and therefter passed through several hands until it was purchased in 1624 by William Anson, a lawyer, of Dunston, Staffordshire. In about 1693 his grandson William Anson demolished the old house and created a new mansion.. The entrance front then to the west, comprised a balustraded three-storey, seven-bayed central block. In about 1748 his great grandson Thomas Anson commissioned architect Thomas Wright to remodel the house, which was extended with flanking two-storey, three-bayed pavilions linked to the central block by pedimented passages. At the turn of the 18th century the house was further altered and extended by architect Samuel Wyatt, when the pavilions and passages were incorporated into the main building and a new porticoed entrance front with ten Doric order pillars was created at the east for Thomas Anson, the 1st Viscount Anson and his wife Anne Margaret Coke. Like Monday’s image of the front of Shugborough Hall the back doesn’t look particularly artistic in design either, in my opinion, although there are some fine shrubs and lawns.

 

comments (20)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 17 Apr 2013, 01:27
Function formal back garden, Brian...enough lawn to accomodate a Jamboree of Scout tents.
Brian Walbey: Indeed Ray, but where would the guides go, I know, perhaps they could share!!!
  • Frances
  • United States
  • 17 Apr 2013, 02:12
Breathtaking shot Brian! The eye-catcher are those marvelous hedges. smile
Brian Walbey: I feel the garden is more striking than the house to be honest Frances.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 17 Apr 2013, 03:48
I like how they have trimmed the trees
Brian Walbey: They look good don't they, it is called topiary.
It has a lot of long history of renovations Brian... but it looks like it has been put together with some parts missing...(imo)... but the hedges are nicely trimmed....petersmile
Brian Walbey: My feelings entirely Peter, I like the garden bit much better.
Well cared for, I wish they'd add a bit more color.
Brian Walbey: The whole of the outside, gardens and house is a bit dull, there is a small flower garden which I am showing later in the week.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 17 Apr 2013, 06:45
Architecturally it's a bit odd but I'm sure it is all very grand within
Brian Walbey: Not all that exciting is it, you might remember my inside series which starts here http://brianaw.shutterchance.com/image/2012/05/07/a-look-inside-shugborough-house-17/
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 17 Apr 2013, 07:11
Someone sure has to work hard on those bushes, Brian! smile But so English.
Brian Walbey: Yes no doubt there is a team of gardeners to look after this. I wish we had one at our house!
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 Apr 2013, 07:36
Oh I don't know; I think it looks fine. Put it this way, I'd be happy to live there - provided someone did the maintenance smile The gardener needs to get his act togtehr, though; look at the state of the lawn on the right.
Brian Walbey: I'm not saying I wouldn't want to live there Alan, as long as I don't have to pay any bills or do any work smile
I hope they have a gardener
Brian Walbey: NO doubt a team of them Chantal.
a very interesting architecture Brian , nice photo as always
Brian Walbey: A bit of a mixture isn't it Juan.
  • gutteridge
  • where latitude and attitude meet
  • 17 Apr 2013, 10:03
I like the way they cut the turf around that stone ball because they could not be bothered to move it.
Brian Walbey: It shouldn't have been difficult to kick it out of the way should it.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 17 Apr 2013, 10:50
a fine back frontage of the manor house with an elegant formal garden! In my view it looks rather 'artistic in design', sorry.
Brian Walbey: Don't be sorry Philine, we have so many architectural gems of stately houses in the U.K.that I just feel this is a bit bland compared with some of the others.
I prefer this side of the house, as a front entrance....it looks more welcoming to me. Nicely composed shot, Brian smile
Brian Walbey: I think your right there Martin, this could make a much more inviting main entrance than the actual one at the front.
This looks better with the lawns and topiary to the fore.
Brian Walbey: That's what I think Martin but still a bit plain.
That lawn on the right could do with some miracle gro!
Brian Walbey: One wouldn't normally expect to see a bit of lawn looking like that at an NT property.
A very well looked after property Brian!
Brian Walbey: Indeed it is Richard, mainly by our National Trust.
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 17 Apr 2013, 19:19
The lawns here seem to have suffered a bit, Brian. Everything else seems meticulously kept
Brian Walbey: Yes it's surprising they have left a bit of dead lawn.
Such a grand view Brian... lovely.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Jacquelyn.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 17 Apr 2013, 20:19
Beautiful POV. I think the gardener has a full time job just for those hedges.
Always impressed with them.
Brian Walbey: Yes there is a lot of work to do in gardens at places like these.
Favourite of the day for me Brian, just love the array of forms you've captured here - it looks a splendid location!
Brian Walbey: Yes a nice mix of garden bits and pieces, they help to brighten up the rather plain house behind.

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