brianaw

11 Apr 2013 454 views
 
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photoblog image St.Wystan's, Repton 4/7

St.Wystan's, Repton 4/7

A closer look at the statue of St.Wystan over the doorway of the two storey 15th.Century porch at St.Wystan’s parish church, Repton. Wystan (or Wigstan) was the grandson of King Wiglaf and a prince of Mercia. In a struggle over the succession to the Mercian throne he was murdered in 849 by Berhtferht, the son of Wiglaf's successor, and buried in his grandfather's mausoleum at Repton. Miracles occurred. Florence of Worcester, writing before 1118, tells that a column of light shot to heaven from the place where he was murdered and remained visible for 30 days. When the Vikings invaded, the remains of St Wystan were taken away by escaping monks; they were returned to Repton when the Viking menace disappeared.  It took a lot of work here to almost eliminate the converging verticals on this, but not quite.

St.Wystan's, Repton 4/7

A closer look at the statue of St.Wystan over the doorway of the two storey 15th.Century porch at St.Wystan’s parish church, Repton. Wystan (or Wigstan) was the grandson of King Wiglaf and a prince of Mercia. In a struggle over the succession to the Mercian throne he was murdered in 849 by Berhtferht, the son of Wiglaf's successor, and buried in his grandfather's mausoleum at Repton. Miracles occurred. Florence of Worcester, writing before 1118, tells that a column of light shot to heaven from the place where he was murdered and remained visible for 30 days. When the Vikings invaded, the remains of St Wystan were taken away by escaping monks; they were returned to Repton when the Viking menace disappeared.  It took a lot of work here to almost eliminate the converging verticals on this, but not quite.

comments (16)

  • Frances
  • United States
  • 11 Apr 2013, 01:33
Fantastic capture Brian! The shot combined with the narrative was very enjoyable. smile
Brian Walbey: I'm glad you enjoyed it Frances.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 11 Apr 2013, 05:59
It still stands up very well to the closer shot, Brian.

I especially like the bloody sword.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ray. I trust that is bloody as in bodily fluidssmile
This is wonderful - the detail is great ad I love the writeup! You did a great job of avoiding the convergence, I think!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Elizabeth.
You are making this into a very good series Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard, I'm please people are enjoying it, I do tend to show quite a lot of churches.
very well framed the saint...

Yep... I am doing a photoblog round today, as therapy, will not be able to do it every day, and my own blog is still down, but the first start is here...
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chantal. I hadn't realised you'd had an accident, I'm glad that things must be improving as you are able to visit SC today, get well very soon.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 11 Apr 2013, 08:07
a fine detail photo of this saint we don't know on the continent (sorry, I don't know).
Brian Walbey: I hadn't heard of this saint either Philine, everywhere one goes one comes across all these unknown saints I find.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 11 Apr 2013, 08:41
Thank you for this Brian: an interesting story to accompany the statue
Brian Walbey: A pleasure Chris.
A quality sculpture in remarkably good condition.
Brian Walbey: Yes it does look to be well looked after.
  • Chad
  • Where latitude and attitude meet
  • 11 Apr 2013, 09:45
A nice detail Brian, good to see these things.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chad, it is well looked after it seems.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Apr 2013, 14:41
Good work on the edit, Brian, and thanks for the history, too. I can imagine that the sword would have been extremely difficult to hold for any length of time.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Alan. I've always thought those sort of swords must have been very heavy to use in a battle.
Wistful looking chap isn't he? Nicely captured detail Brian and an interesting story
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill.
  • John Prior
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Apr 2013, 17:42
Nice detail Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks John.
That's a very fine bit of statuary, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It has certainly weathered well over the years Tom.
Nicely captured with great details Brian!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard, it has been kept in good condition.
You've made a good job of this, Brian. Great detail in both picture and narrative.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Graeme.
This is very appealing, Brian; lovely to look at. Love the warm colours and wonderful detail. Do you know if that's the original glass in the windows?
Brian Walbey: Yes fine coloured stone isn't it. I don't know about the glass to be honest Beverly.

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