brianaw

13 Jan 2013 47 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Lynmouth 7/7

Lynmouth 7/7

Above Lynmouth is the village of Lynton which have featured here in times gone by and for pedestrians the easiest way to move between one village and the other is by the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway. Opened on Easter Monday in 1890, the railway has been in continuous use ever since. An Act of Parliament formed the Lynmouth & Lynton Lift Company in 1888, and a further Act gave the company perpetual rights to the water from the Lyn Valley, this being used to propel the passenger cars up and down the sloping track. The railway comprises two cars, each capable of transporting 40 passengers, joined by a continuous cable running around a 5 ft 6 in (1.676 m) pulley at each end of the incline. Water feeds through 5-inch (127 mm) pipes from the West Lyn River - over a mile away - into tanks under the floor of the upper car. Each car has a 700-imperial-gallon (3,182 L; 841 US gal) tank mounted between the wheels. Water is discharged from the lower car, until the heavier top car begins to descend, with the speed controlled by a brakeman travelling on each car. The parallel 3 ft 9 in gauge (1,143 mm)[2] tracks (which bow out at the centre point, to allow the cars to pass) rise 500 feet (152.4 m) and are 862 feet (262.7 m) long, giving the line a gradient of 1:1.724 (58%).

Lynmouth 7/7

Above Lynmouth is the village of Lynton which have featured here in times gone by and for pedestrians the easiest way to move between one village and the other is by the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway. Opened on Easter Monday in 1890, the railway has been in continuous use ever since. An Act of Parliament formed the Lynmouth & Lynton Lift Company in 1888, and a further Act gave the company perpetual rights to the water from the Lyn Valley, this being used to propel the passenger cars up and down the sloping track. The railway comprises two cars, each capable of transporting 40 passengers, joined by a continuous cable running around a 5 ft 6 in (1.676 m) pulley at each end of the incline. Water feeds through 5-inch (127 mm) pipes from the West Lyn River - over a mile away - into tanks under the floor of the upper car. Each car has a 700-imperial-gallon (3,182 L; 841 US gal) tank mounted between the wheels. Water is discharged from the lower car, until the heavier top car begins to descend, with the speed controlled by a brakeman travelling on each car. The parallel 3 ft 9 in gauge (1,143 mm)[2] tracks (which bow out at the centre point, to allow the cars to pass) rise 500 feet (152.4 m) and are 862 feet (262.7 m) long, giving the line a gradient of 1:1.724 (58%).

comments (2)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 14 Jan 2013, 08:35
"...
...echoes sound afar
Funinculee...funinculah"
Brian Walbey: My word that old song takes me back Ray. This is quite fun to go on and saves a very steep walk back to the top.
The ONLY way up, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Certainly is Graeme, and it is quite a long way.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Olympus E-450
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/100s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 14.0mm
Coming Up In 2020 -  1 of ..........Coming Up In 202...
Wareham - The River Frome 1/7Wareham - The Ri...
Lynmouth 6/7Lynmouth 6/7

Warning