brianaw

14 Aug 2012 93 views
 
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photoblog image Hatton Locks 2/5

Hatton Locks 2/5

Looking in the opposite direction to yesterdays image the locks continue away up the hill, the route we took for the next three photographs.  The flight was opened in December 1799 on the Warwick and Birmingham Canal. In 1929, the canal was renamed as the Grand Union Canal (on unification of a number of operators) and the decision was made to widen the Hatton stretch. In order to accommodate traders with heavy cargoes of coal, sugar, tea and spices up the flight, the locks were widened to 14 feet (4.3 m) – allowing navigation by industrial boats or two single narrow boats. The widening was completed in the mid-1930s using a work force of 1,000, and the revolutionary concrete lock system was opened by Prince George, Duke of Kent.

Hatton Locks 2/5

Looking in the opposite direction to yesterdays image the locks continue away up the hill, the route we took for the next three photographs.  The flight was opened in December 1799 on the Warwick and Birmingham Canal. In 1929, the canal was renamed as the Grand Union Canal (on unification of a number of operators) and the decision was made to widen the Hatton stretch. In order to accommodate traders with heavy cargoes of coal, sugar, tea and spices up the flight, the locks were widened to 14 feet (4.3 m) – allowing navigation by industrial boats or two single narrow boats. The widening was completed in the mid-1930s using a work force of 1,000, and the revolutionary concrete lock system was opened by Prince George, Duke of Kent.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 14 Aug 2012, 01:00
This picture seems less dramatic than yesterday's, Brian.
Brian Walbey: The rise of the hill from hereon is more shallow than the drop of the lower part I showed yesterday.
Fascinating engineering - captured very well Brian!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Elizabeth, good to see our English forefathers work still in use after all this time.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 14 Aug 2012, 07:27
I wonder if in retrospect that widening made sense Brian?
Brian Walbey: It does seem a bit late in history but to advantage now canals are used so much for leisure.
I didn't realise they were widened as late as that Brian
Brian Walbey: I didn't either, I suspect some canals would by then have been going out of use for industrial purposes at least.
  • Pedroeric
  • United Kingdom
  • 14 Aug 2012, 11:05
Looks a lot like Caen hill lock gates at Devizes Brian.
Brian Walbey: I've just Googled Caen Hill, very similar but less locks spread over a much shorter distance, but still a marvel of engineering by our forefathers.
Lovely shot Brian, the colours are vibrant!
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Martin.
Great point of view and colour.
Brian Walbey: Thanks John, we were lucky to have a really sunny day while we were there.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 14 Aug 2012, 12:37
You sure of that date, Brian, for the widening? I would have thought some canals were well in decline by then as the railways had taken over. I like your viewpoint.
Brian Walbey: I would have thought the same Alan but the dates are definitely correct and it appears they went against tradition and used a lot of concrete in the construction of the widened stretches.
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 14 Aug 2012, 17:27
Some system, Brian. A very pleasant mellow picture
Brian Walbey: Thanks Lisl, we were lucky to go on a day when only a few fellow retirees were about.
You would work up a sweat on a sunny day!
Brian Walbey: Certainly could Tom, you'd be worn out by the time you've reached the top or bottom!
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet.
  • 14 Aug 2012, 18:09
These locks seem to be in very good condition and very tidy too.
Brian Walbey: Yes they are all well looked after it seems.
Another wonderful perspective Brian. Thank you for the informative words!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard, I'm pleased you are finding this interesting.
Good viewpoint, Brian, nicely presented.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Graeme.
I like the angle that you chose to show the double lock Brian... many of the locks in Canada are still manually cranked open and closed....petersmile
Brian Walbey: All 21 of these are manually cranked Peter, one must be worn out after going through the lot.

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camera Olympus E-450
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/200s
aperture f/7.1
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 21.0mm
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