brianaw

27 Jun 2012 109 views
 
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photoblog image St.George's Church and Priory, Dunster 3/7

St.George's Church and Priory, Dunster 3/7

The Church of St George at Dunster is very special. It is a wool church, built largely in the late medieval period with the profits made by merchants from local industry and trade. Long before that there was a smaller Norman church on the site. The Norman west door arch survives. Before 1100 the lord of the manor, William de Mohun gave the church and lands to Bath Abbey and a small daughter priory was set up in Dunster.  Here you can see the beautiful screen built right across the church from one side to the other, I took quite a few shots of this, to the left a fine pulpit, and beyond the magnificent chancel, When the current church was first built it was one large area with the high altar at the east end of the church. The monks and parishioners had a dispute during the 1400s related to the times and ordering of services, use of bells, and much more. The dispute was arbitrated in 1498 at Glastonbury. There was a decision made for the parishioners to erect and maintain a choir separate from the monks. This is the origin of the church’s great screen crossing the nave, chancel, and sanctuary. The 54 foot long screen, built in 1499, is thought to be the longest carved rood screen in the world. One of its features is fan vaulting. The original screen that spanned the tower arch was moved to the eastern arch of the south transept.

 

St.George's Church and Priory, Dunster 3/7

The Church of St George at Dunster is very special. It is a wool church, built largely in the late medieval period with the profits made by merchants from local industry and trade. Long before that there was a smaller Norman church on the site. The Norman west door arch survives. Before 1100 the lord of the manor, William de Mohun gave the church and lands to Bath Abbey and a small daughter priory was set up in Dunster.  Here you can see the beautiful screen built right across the church from one side to the other, I took quite a few shots of this, to the left a fine pulpit, and beyond the magnificent chancel, When the current church was first built it was one large area with the high altar at the east end of the church. The monks and parishioners had a dispute during the 1400s related to the times and ordering of services, use of bells, and much more. The dispute was arbitrated in 1498 at Glastonbury. There was a decision made for the parishioners to erect and maintain a choir separate from the monks. This is the origin of the church’s great screen crossing the nave, chancel, and sanctuary. The 54 foot long screen, built in 1499, is thought to be the longest carved rood screen in the world. One of its features is fan vaulting. The original screen that spanned the tower arch was moved to the eastern arch of the south transept.

 

comments (17)

A grand interior Brian.
Brian Walbey: Indeed it is Les, lots to photograph.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 27 Jun 2012, 00:58
Wow! Beautiful!

I think the world's biggest screen is a bit of a mistake, though, as this gorgeous vault needs to be seen unencumbered, IMHO.
Brian Walbey: Yes I'm not sure that it is the biggest, but whatever, it is very attractive.
Very nice composition Brian... there are so many straight lines... curves... and angles in this shot and the vaulted ceiling is grand....petersmile
Brian Walbey: I think we can say altogether a fine looking church Peter.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 27 Jun 2012, 06:25
Very interesting Brian: it is all news to me
Brian Walbey: Somewhere to visit next time you travel that way Chris.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 27 Jun 2012, 07:03
WOW! Can you imagine worshipping there, Brian?!

(I do see the irony, however, with a dispute in a church that lasted so long and had to be arbitrated!)
Brian Walbey: I would like to sing in that church Ginnie, it is very nice. Our Minister was with me and felt he could easily get up in that pulpit and give a sermon, I reminded him he was on holiday, his sermons are 25 minutes minimum!
There are very warm colours inside this church Brian. I particularly like the tiles on thebfloor
Brian Walbey: Yes the floor tiles are very fine Chad, almost a shame to walk on them.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Jun 2012, 08:07
Very impressive; just as I would have hoped. The screen sounds amazing and a wonderful testament to the skill of the craftsmen.
Brian Walbey: It is a fine screen Alan, and you will see more of the chancel tomorrow which is equally attractive.
That is indeed an impressive screen Brian
Brian Walbey: It is easy to admire all the workmanship that went into carving things like that isn't it.
  • Pedroeric
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Jun 2012, 10:39
Will have to have a look in next time we are down there Brian though it would be great to see inside.
Brian Walbey: Well worth a visit Peter, and the garden i showed last week is just outside as wel.
A stunning looking interior Brian, equal if not better than the exterior.
Brian Walbey: Indeed it is Fred, the chancel is equally attractive, I'm showing that tomorrow.
A stunning interior Brian! I do like the warm lighting smile
Brian Walbey: Indeed it is Martin. the lighting is to highlight the chancel which I am showing tomorrow.
what a low ceiling, never seen that here
Brian Walbey: I guess parts of the church were built at different times so everything was sort of fitted in where possible.
My eye is immediately drawn to that warm & lovely light reflected in the arch in front, Brian. Makes the interior so inviting. St. George's Church certainly has a long & interesting history.
Brian Walbey: Yes the lighting does catch the eye, Thursdays picture shows you why, thanks Beverly.
Good interior shot with nice light balance
Brian Walbey: Thanks John.
A wonderful interior with warm tones Brian!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard.
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Jun 2012, 19:23
Richly sumptuous colours.
Brian Walbey: Altogether a lovely church, the lighting highlights the chancel area in my Thursday picture.
An amazing screen, Brian. You've shown it relly well. Makes for a vey unusual church interior shot.
Brian Walbey: Yes I was quite impressed when I saw the screen Graeme, as was the Minister from our church who was with me at the time.

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camera Olympus E-450
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/60s
aperture f/3.5
sensitivity ISO400
focal length 14.0mm
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