brianaw

21 Mar 2012 203 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image More From The Slide Scanner 3/21

More From The Slide Scanner 3/21

SUTHERLAND

Our last Isle of Man holiday was in 1998 and while we were there the Isle of Man Steam Railway had some big events during the week and I was able to take quite a lot of pictures of their genuine Victorian locomotives and carriages.

 

Built in time for the opening day of the railway on 1 July 1873 and allocated works number 1253 by Beyer, Peacock this locomotive is named after the Duke of Sutherland who was a director of the railway company in its formative days. She was given the honour of hauling the first official train to Peel and remained in service, albeit as Douglas shunter only latterly, until 1964 when she was withdrawn and stored. When the Marquess of Ailsa took over the railway in 1967 she was painted spring green and placed on static display at St John's, a tradition that later came to Douglas when the railway closed at the end of the 1968 season. When the new railway museum was opened in 1975 she was given pride of place and it seemed that was the end of the line.

 

However, with anniversaries being in the air, she was brought back to Douglas in October 1997 for feasibility studies to examine her possible return to service for the Steam 125 celebrations the following year. Using the privately-owned boiler from No. 8 Fenella she was the star turn in 1998, and travelled to the Manx Electric Railway on occasion steaming from Laxey to Fairy Cottage. She even made a brief return to Peel Station to commemorate the opening of the Peel line. She later was repainted to Indian red and withdrawn when the boiler was removed and replaced into the frames of No. 8. No. 1 is now in store at Douglas station, whilst No. 8 was withdrawn early summer 2008.

 

More From The Slide Scanner 3/21

SUTHERLAND

Our last Isle of Man holiday was in 1998 and while we were there the Isle of Man Steam Railway had some big events during the week and I was able to take quite a lot of pictures of their genuine Victorian locomotives and carriages.

 

Built in time for the opening day of the railway on 1 July 1873 and allocated works number 1253 by Beyer, Peacock this locomotive is named after the Duke of Sutherland who was a director of the railway company in its formative days. She was given the honour of hauling the first official train to Peel and remained in service, albeit as Douglas shunter only latterly, until 1964 when she was withdrawn and stored. When the Marquess of Ailsa took over the railway in 1967 she was painted spring green and placed on static display at St John's, a tradition that later came to Douglas when the railway closed at the end of the 1968 season. When the new railway museum was opened in 1975 she was given pride of place and it seemed that was the end of the line.

 

However, with anniversaries being in the air, she was brought back to Douglas in October 1997 for feasibility studies to examine her possible return to service for the Steam 125 celebrations the following year. Using the privately-owned boiler from No. 8 Fenella she was the star turn in 1998, and travelled to the Manx Electric Railway on occasion steaming from Laxey to Fairy Cottage. She even made a brief return to Peel Station to commemorate the opening of the Peel line. She later was repainted to Indian red and withdrawn when the boiler was removed and replaced into the frames of No. 8. No. 1 is now in store at Douglas station, whilst No. 8 was withdrawn early summer 2008.

 

comments (18)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 21 Mar 2012, 00:31
That is a shiny brass cone, Brian...perhaps indicating the primary role of the driver?
Brian Walbey: It is a fine dome Ray, it would be a joy to polish it.
  • Debb
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 Mar 2012, 01:45
Another great train. Thanks, and thanks for the info too.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Debb.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 21 Mar 2012, 07:12
A beautiful looking locomotive Brian: I actually like this rather bright green. The preserved Lord Nelson (a very distant cousin admittedly) has a very similar hue
Brian Walbey: It is a lovely loco Chris, one of quite a few still running on the island. I agree about the paint colour, a lighter hue than Sir Lamiel.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 21 Mar 2012, 07:22
One of my friends is a Sutherland, Brian. I bet he would LOVE this hanging on his wall!
Brian Walbey: NO doubt he would Ginnie, hopefully most men would. Perhaps he is a descendent of the Duke referred to in the text.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 21 Mar 2012, 07:36
Shes a ripper
Brian Walbey: She is indeed vintage.
What a dear little thing Brian. So shiny it hardly looks real.
Brian Walbey: Yes one of several still in use on the island.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 Mar 2012, 09:22
Lovingly cared for!
Brian Walbey: Yes it is Mike, as are the other ones like it still in use.
the green is very nice
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed, it suits this fine old engine.
A beautifully maintained old engine, Brian. Beautiful
Brian Walbey: It is Tom, one of several still in regular use on the island.
She is so beautiful and seems to come straight from the box Brian!
Brian Walbey: She had just been returned to service from the workshops at the time I took this Richard, isn't she great.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 21 Mar 2012, 16:52
This is a beauty indeed.
Wonderful colours.
Brian Walbey: Yes she is Astrid, I do like the colour of this. (I note you are not accepting comments as such at the moment, I guess you are a very busy lady.)
  • John Prior
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 21 Mar 2012, 17:16
Great old locomotive, resplendent in green. You certainly are getting some fine results from your film scanner. In 1998 I did not imagine that film would become so much a thing of the past also.
Brian Walbey: Yes she is John. I'm very pleased with the scanner, especially if the original slide is of fairly good quality, which this one is.)
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 21 Mar 2012, 17:51
This looks like something out of my Grandson's "Thomas the Tank Engine" books, Brian. Am I being frivolous?
Brian Walbey: No you are not being frivolous, when the Rev.W.Awdry first wrote a story for his son, who had the Measles, in 1942 he based it on the Isle of Man, and later on other little railways. You might like to read more about it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Railway_Series
Nice shot and I enjoyed the history lesson! Cheers, Dave.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Dave.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 Mar 2012, 18:18
What a grand sight this is! I've not been to the Isle of Man since the late 1960s at which time the railways were in steep decline (or even shut; I as not too interested in them at the time as I discovered woman - now I lost interest in women and I'm back to railways again; far less trouble and a lot more fun! I digress...). No sign of that this is a scan so well done for that.
Brian Walbey: Yes I went several times in the 60's and the railway was in poor shape, a lot of the locos and carriages were standing in sidings at St.Johns. I can understand the women thing, it happens to us all, well most of us anyway, but nowadays I can deal with women and trains.
Can you call an engine `cute`? I like this one a lot, and I don`t know why. Lovely capture. (:o)
Brian Walbey: Yes you can call an engine cute Rosalyn, but you must remember they are always a "she" as well, don't ask me why smile
One day I'll get to the Isle of Man for their steam gala, a grand little engine Brian.
Brian Walbey: Well worth going over for Les.
What a nice bright green! Nice shot and history too.
Brian Walbey: Yes she looks great doesn't she.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera unknown
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed unknown
aperture f/0.0
sensitivity unknown
focal length 0.0mm
Whitby 'Choccie Box' Style 11/14Whitby 'Choccie ...
A Saturday At Sudbury Hall 2/5A Saturday At Su...
Hardwick Hall 7/7Hardwick Hall 7/...

Warning