brianaw

31 Jan 2012 144 views
 
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photoblog image Whatton House Gardens 2/7

Whatton House Gardens 2/7

Moving further on from yesterday round the outside of the walled garden this grassy path leads down to the rear part of Whatton House itself. As I said on Monday the house isn’t open to the public and a bit further on the garden becomes private. You can just see a small part of the rear of the house in this picture.

 

 Whatton House was originally built in 1802 for Edward Dawson and was bought by the first Lord Crawshaw in the 1870’s when the Dawson’s moved to Launde Abbey. Only a short time later a disastrous fire struck, leading to the house being almost entirely rebuilt in 1876.

 

The reconstructed house had 26 bedrooms which housed an army of cooks, maids, butlers and footmen, but various alterations have been made to it over the years, including the demolition in the 1950’s of a large part of the back of the house to adapt it for modern living without a large staff. Unaffected by the fire, the stable yard and the walled garden date from 1802, and many of the trees in the park and gardens are also over 200 years old.

 

During World War II the house was offered as a Maternity hospital by the then Lord Crawshaw and 2324 babies were born there, mostly to mothers who were evacuated from the bombing in London. It wasn’t as peaceful as had been hoped because several bombs were dropped in the area and a house was destroyed only half a mile away. On 10th February 1941 thirty incendiary bombs fell in the grounds. After the war the Crawshaw’s returned to Whatton House, and it remains their family home.

 

I didn’t take a picture of the house but one of my fellow club members did and you can see that picture here.

Whatton House Gardens 2/7

Moving further on from yesterday round the outside of the walled garden this grassy path leads down to the rear part of Whatton House itself. As I said on Monday the house isn’t open to the public and a bit further on the garden becomes private. You can just see a small part of the rear of the house in this picture.

 

 Whatton House was originally built in 1802 for Edward Dawson and was bought by the first Lord Crawshaw in the 1870’s when the Dawson’s moved to Launde Abbey. Only a short time later a disastrous fire struck, leading to the house being almost entirely rebuilt in 1876.

 

The reconstructed house had 26 bedrooms which housed an army of cooks, maids, butlers and footmen, but various alterations have been made to it over the years, including the demolition in the 1950’s of a large part of the back of the house to adapt it for modern living without a large staff. Unaffected by the fire, the stable yard and the walled garden date from 1802, and many of the trees in the park and gardens are also over 200 years old.

 

During World War II the house was offered as a Maternity hospital by the then Lord Crawshaw and 2324 babies were born there, mostly to mothers who were evacuated from the bombing in London. It wasn’t as peaceful as had been hoped because several bombs were dropped in the area and a house was destroyed only half a mile away. On 10th February 1941 thirty incendiary bombs fell in the grounds. After the war the Crawshaw’s returned to Whatton House, and it remains their family home.

 

I didn’t take a picture of the house but one of my fellow club members did and you can see that picture here.

comments (18)

This shot is a beauty, Brian. Whatton House has such an interesting history; how fortunate to have such a lovely place so close to where you live.
Brian Walbey: I never knew all this history until I Googled it apart from knowing it had been a maternity home during the war, but it is a nice place to go only a few minutes from home.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 31 Jan 2012, 04:10
Magnificent shrubbery, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Yes it is Ray and later this week you will see a couple of flower close ups I took, although they are not up to your standard to be honest.
It's clearly a wonderful place, and the gardening is well kept!
Brian Walbey: It is a very nice place to visit Elizabeth, not every week but at different seasons.
  • lisl
  • England
  • 31 Jan 2012, 07:38
I am enjoying this virtual walk, Brian
Brian Walbey: I'm pleased to hear that Lisl, tomorrow you can take a rest on your walk.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 31 Jan 2012, 08:14
I love the plant border against that fine wall Brian
Brian Walbey: Yes and there was some fine plants in there Chris, you will see a couple of them later in the week.
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet.
  • 31 Jan 2012, 08:31
The house is flying some sort of flag Brian.
Brian Walbey: Perhaps it is their own family flag Chad.
A good story for those people born there to be able to tell
Brian Walbey: Yes it is Bill, there were several houses round our way used like this in the war, indeed one of my old friends back home was born in another local mansion his Mum being evacuated out from Islington early in the war.
such a friendly composition
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chantal.
  • Pedroeric
  • United Kingdom
  • 31 Jan 2012, 10:19
Good write up and looks an impressive place to go Brian and your friends picture is impressive to.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Pedroeric.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 31 Jan 2012, 10:54
Yes, I follow your way- and what a huge, impressive manor house with a great and also very sad history according to your information! Hospitals should never be bombed during wars according to the rules of the Red Cross! Lolrd Crawshaw must be a wonderful personality.
Brian Walbey: It is a shame the house isn't open but it takes a lot of time and work to do that I would think, although they do host weddings and so on there. We met Lady Crawshaw in the garden and she chatted with us for about 15 minutes, she was very nice, not at all posh and was probably in her early 70's.
I like gardens and flowers much more than houses anyway.
Brian Walbey: Yes so do I to be honest Mary.
  • Martin
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 31 Jan 2012, 13:02
What a beautiful capture Brian, I can feel the warmth of that summer breeze smile
Brian Walbey: I wish we could feel that summer breeze today Martin, it's horrible here.
Can't beat gardens like this one.
Brian Walbey: No it is a very nice place to visit Richard and not too far from you.
They were so smart in those day, the high red brick walls apart from being decorative afforded a high degree of protection to the plants. The bricks soaked up the day time heat like a storage radiator, thus enabling the growing of many tender species.
Brian Walbey: They knew a lot more about things than we give them credit for I always feel.
I love walled gardens!
Brian Walbey: So do I Tom, shame one can't get into this one.
Not a bad place to live smile
Brian Walbey: Couldn't agree more John, but a tad out of my pocket!
It is quite a well looked after place Brian. Lovely capture!
Brian Walbey: Yes the whole of the garden area is well kept Richard.
Yes, also another glorious garden, I love the angle and dimensions leading the eye along to the house. That fantastic cloudscape too, Brian!
Brian Walbey: The flower beds around the wall are really nice and the wall and path gives a very good compositional opportunity.

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