brianaw

26 Jan 2012 106 views
 
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photoblog image From The Slide Scanner 11/14

From The Slide Scanner 11/14

NIMROD

 

Like a couple of other aircraft pictures in this series this was taken at an airshow near to where I used to live in Cambridgeshire, proably RAF Wytn near Huntingdon.

 

The Hawker Siddeley Nimrod was a military aircraft developed and built in the United Kingdom. It is an extensive modification of the de Havilland Comet, the world's first jet airliner. It was originally designed by de Havilland's successor, Hawker Siddeley, now part of BAE Systems.

 

It was designed as a Royal Air Force maritime patrol aircraft, the Nimrod MR1/MR2, its major role being anti-submarine warfare (ASW), although it also had secondary roles in maritime surveillance and anti-surface warfare. It served from the early 1970s until March 2010. The current Nimrod series was due to be replaced by the now cancelled Nimrod MRA4.

 

Sadly the Government has now decided to take this beautiful looking, and very efficient machine out of service completely, a wise decision, time will tell!

From The Slide Scanner 11/14

NIMROD

 

Like a couple of other aircraft pictures in this series this was taken at an airshow near to where I used to live in Cambridgeshire, proably RAF Wytn near Huntingdon.

 

The Hawker Siddeley Nimrod was a military aircraft developed and built in the United Kingdom. It is an extensive modification of the de Havilland Comet, the world's first jet airliner. It was originally designed by de Havilland's successor, Hawker Siddeley, now part of BAE Systems.

 

It was designed as a Royal Air Force maritime patrol aircraft, the Nimrod MR1/MR2, its major role being anti-submarine warfare (ASW), although it also had secondary roles in maritime surveillance and anti-surface warfare. It served from the early 1970s until March 2010. The current Nimrod series was due to be replaced by the now cancelled Nimrod MRA4.

 

Sadly the Government has now decided to take this beautiful looking, and very efficient machine out of service completely, a wise decision, time will tell!

comments (16)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 26 Jan 2012, 00:37
I guess that Unicorn horn is designed for ramming and skewering submarines, when the pilot dives the aircraft into the water, Brian?

[grin]
Brian Walbey: [Grin also] These were really fine aircraft Ray, even though they are a few decades old, but our stupid government have decided to get rid of them, together with loads of soldiers, sailors and airmen, to save money, have no early warning method to sense an attack, all to keep loads of civil servants employed in our Ministry of defence, and pay them outlandish bonuses for sitting on their arses all day. Sorry rant over, but we are now an almost defenceless country IMHO.
it is an amazing looking thing - and I love your processing, it looks like it's from the 50s!
Brian Walbey: Yes it does date from the 50's Elizabeth, it is a military version of the Comet jetliners from that period.
This is a great looking jet Brian and you have framed your shot very well....petersmile
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Peter.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 26 Jan 2012, 07:17
A classic looking shot of a very useful aircraft Brian
Brian Walbey: And what a shame the goons in the MOD are naive enough to think we can do without them.
It is amazing to think how long these were in service. I think every child in the 50s had a toy comet smile
Brian Walbey: And, IMHO, I think they should still be in service for many more years to come, but I guess some twerp in the MOD will get a nice bonus for suggesting we get rid of them along with loads of soldiers, sailors and airmen.
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet.
  • 26 Jan 2012, 08:59
I do like this in black and white Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Chad.
The B&W fits well here
Brian Walbey: Yes I hoped it would date it accordingly Chantal.
  • Fred Adams
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 26 Jan 2012, 10:32
Impressive capture Brian, great detail which stands out in B&W.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Fred, I thought the mono would age it a bit more.
  • Pedroeric
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 Jan 2012, 11:10
Work horse of the military Brain, we will lean one day.

Superb capture of it.
Brian Walbey: Couldn't agree more Pedroeric, they should never have been scrapped IMHO.
  • Martin
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 26 Jan 2012, 12:41
A great shot Brian and interesting history!
I'm sure my first domestic flight was in a De Havilland Comet; it would've been late seventies, maybe early eighties.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Martin. I'm not sure when Comets stopped being used for commercial flights, I do believe they were the first jet airliners though.
Lovely capture Brian. This plane reminds me of the "Comet"!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard. It will remind you of the Comet because that is what they are/were, ie.redesigned for military use also.
  • Linda
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 26 Jan 2012, 13:52
B/W suits it very well, this slide scanner does a really good job at copying smile
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Linda.
De Havilland to me is some sort of Harley Davidson of the air, their engines sounding very much different than others. Beautiful piece then with the double twin engines inside the wings.
Brian Walbey: I have always thought these very elegant planes Juan, it is a shame our government has decided to do away with them.
It seems that the days of such things are past, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It does Tom, a very foolish decision as far as I'm concerned, we will soon be defenceless.
Another fascinating one, Brian! Near here at Manston the MoD have a redundant Nimrod which arrived last year for the Fire & Rescue training. I agree, it's a bit sad sometimes witnessing these things pass into disuse.
Brian Walbey: I think it is a great shame these planes have been scrapped Neil, they might be getting old but they were apparently still doing a good job, and I am not sure if anything has replaced them
  • paul
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Jan 2012, 20:44
they were incredible aircraft and their untimely fate was a disgrace
Brian Walbey: I can only agree with you 100% Paul, I believe there has not been any suitable replacement provided either.

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