brianaw

19 Jan 2012 101 views
 
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photoblog image From The Slide Scanner 4/14

From The Slide Scanner 4/14

CANBERRA VN799?

 

The RAF airbase at Wyton, between Huntingdon and St.Ives, Cambridgeshire still flew a large number of Canberra bombers while we were living at St.Ives and they flew over my office almost everyday on their approach flight path to land.

 

RAF Wyton had an open day and air-show one weekend, where I took this picture of a Type T.4 Canberra painted up to look like one of the original prototype aircraft. They were fine aircraft and a joy to see as they were already about 30 years old at that time.

 

The English Electric Canberra is a first-generation jet-powered light bomber manufactured in large numbers through the 1950s. The Canberra could fly at a higher altitude than any other bomber through the 1950s and set a world altitude record of 70,310 ft (21,430 m) in 1957. Due to its ability to evade early interceptors and providing a significant performance advancement over piston-engined bombers then common, the Canberra was a popular export product and served with many nations.

 

In addition to being a tactical nuclear strike aircraft, the Canberra proved to be highly adaptable, serving in varied roles such as tactical bombing and photographic and electronic reconnaissance. Canberra’s served in the Vietnam War, the Falklands War, the Indo-Pakistani Wars, and numerous African conflicts. In several wars, both of the opposing forces had Canberra’s in their air forces. The Canberra was retired by its first operator, the Royal Air Force (RAF), in 23 June 2006, 57 years after its first flight; a few remain in service, performing meteorological work for NASA.


We had a particularly good Prints entry at my camera clubs latest competition last week and you can see the winning entries here if you wish, and yes one of them is mine.

From The Slide Scanner 4/14

CANBERRA VN799?

 

The RAF airbase at Wyton, between Huntingdon and St.Ives, Cambridgeshire still flew a large number of Canberra bombers while we were living at St.Ives and they flew over my office almost everyday on their approach flight path to land.

 

RAF Wyton had an open day and air-show one weekend, where I took this picture of a Type T.4 Canberra painted up to look like one of the original prototype aircraft. They were fine aircraft and a joy to see as they were already about 30 years old at that time.

 

The English Electric Canberra is a first-generation jet-powered light bomber manufactured in large numbers through the 1950s. The Canberra could fly at a higher altitude than any other bomber through the 1950s and set a world altitude record of 70,310 ft (21,430 m) in 1957. Due to its ability to evade early interceptors and providing a significant performance advancement over piston-engined bombers then common, the Canberra was a popular export product and served with many nations.

 

In addition to being a tactical nuclear strike aircraft, the Canberra proved to be highly adaptable, serving in varied roles such as tactical bombing and photographic and electronic reconnaissance. Canberra’s served in the Vietnam War, the Falklands War, the Indo-Pakistani Wars, and numerous African conflicts. In several wars, both of the opposing forces had Canberra’s in their air forces. The Canberra was retired by its first operator, the Royal Air Force (RAF), in 23 June 2006, 57 years after its first flight; a few remain in service, performing meteorological work for NASA.


We had a particularly good Prints entry at my camera clubs latest competition last week and you can see the winning entries here if you wish, and yes one of them is mine.

comments (23)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 19 Jan 2012, 02:00
Quite an elegant looking weapon, isn't it, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It was a real joy seeing these flying over where I used to work Ray, and on one occasion my camera club had a tour of the airbase and my lad, about 13 at the time, got to sit in one as well.
A nice picture Brian, and a very good narrative. Congratulations, on your success at your camera club.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Frances.
Aircraft can make very interesting photos! Great history -

I liked your Raredos photo!! Congrats!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Elizabeth, these were very good aircraft, they used to fly over my office quite regularly.
The blue shade almost makes the bomber look like a toy.
Congrats on your Reredos shot !!!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Jacquelyn. I always thought they were a really good shape.
They had a long innings didn't they. We were quite good at building aircraft once.

Well done with the 2nd place!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill. I always thought these were good planes. On one occasion my camera club got a private visit to the airbase so got close-up and my son, who was about 13 got to sit in one as well, lucky so and so.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 19 Jan 2012, 08:48
I remember these Brian: a really good example of successful engineering
Brian Walbey: Great planes in my opinion Chris, they used to fly over my office at the time most days, but were never over noisy and obtrusive.
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet.
  • 19 Jan 2012, 09:30
As a child the Canberra bomber captured my imagination Brian.
Brian Walbey: I liked them as well Chad, I used to see them flying over my office most days of the week.
It is nice to get bombed by such an stylish plane! smile
Brian Walbey: I guess that's one way of looking at it Juan smile
  • Pedroeric
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 Jan 2012, 10:29
Excellent capture of this pld work horse.
Brian Walbey: Yes I always thought they were very good planes, they lasted an awful long time.
way back into the archives you go
Brian Walbey: Yes Chantal, and these planes go back even further than my archive, sadly they have all gone now.
Great photo of the Canberra, Brian. And congratulations on the winning entry in the competition.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Sheila.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 Jan 2012, 12:31
Crikey ! I remember these being the state of the art when I was a nipper. Well done on your recent win, Brian; at last a judge with soem taste wink
Brian Walbey: Thanks Alan. Yes I remember these from being a child so I didn't mind them flying over me while I lived in Cambridgeshire, nice planes.
I can just remember them when they were state of the art planes,doesn't time fly.
Brian Walbey: It does indeed Martin, I think they were used for reconnaissance during the later parts of their lives.
  • Linda
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 Jan 2012, 14:09
I cant say as I remember seeing these planes,especially because its blue, I thought it may have rang a bell, but not yet! Congrats on your win Brian smile
Brian Walbey: They weren't generally blue Linda but I doubt you would have seen them much away from the Huntingdon area, they were the last base to fly them I think, besides which you are far too young to remember them smile
A great example of the kind of thing we can no longer produce, it seems!
Brian Walbey: Couldn't agree more Tom, I don't think we can produce much at all nowadays to be honest.
  • Fred Adams
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Jan 2012, 15:46
That colour!! Thunderbirds are go!
Brian Walbey: Lol. Yes indeed Fred, it just needs Jeff Tracy and Lady Penelope to climb aboard and off to the skies they could fly.
  • John Prior
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Jan 2012, 16:50
Proof of a good design is that it lasts so long. Well done with the club print placement Brian, some nice work there, Flickr seems like a good idea for displaying camera club work to a wider audience.
Brian Walbey: I agree with you about the plane John, a very good design that served us well. Re the Flickr our member who looks after our website came up with the idea of doing it this way, hopefully people will pick up on our images either through the website or their normal Flickr browsing.
This was a terrific plane Brian!
Lovely capture.
Brian Walbey: They were indeed Richard, they went on for a very long time.
Yes, I remember the Canberra ... but the name is all I remember.
Brian Walbey: They were fine planes Richard, I saw them daily when I lived in St.Ives.
  • lisl
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Jan 2012, 21:31
Well done, Brian, for this photo and the camera club winnings
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Lisl.
Fascinating looking aircraft Brian. I live near RAF Manston and we see some strange looking planes there, from time to time. Most interesting shot!
Brian Walbey: I like the simple shape of the Canberra Neil compared with some of the modern aircraft. I once flew to Calais from Manston back in 1966, is it still a working airfield.
An innovative plane in it's day Brian, congratulations on your second place as well.
Brian Walbey: Yes it was Les, thanks for your comment.
Yes, Brian, Manston is still used, often cargo planes, a few domestic flights e.g. Jersey. I sometimes see the Red Arrows 'parked' there (which looks like something out of Top Gun), as it's often used as a base in the summer when there are air displays in the south east.

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