brianaw

09 Jan 2012 220 views
 
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photoblog image Moira Furnace 1/5

Moira Furnace 1/5

Moira Furnace is a nineteenth-century iron-making blast furnace located in Moira, Leicestershire on the banks of the Ashby-de-la-Zouch Canal. The building has been preserved by North West Leicestershire District Council as a museum featuring lime kilns and craft workshops.

 

It is a most important industrial monument, since it is remarkably well-preserved, and dates from a formative period of the Industrial Revolution.

 

In 1804 the Earl of Moira had the furnace constructed to take advantage of the iron ore and abundant coal which were present underground in the surrounding Ashby Woulds area owned by him. The location was chosen for its proximity to the Ashby Canal for transport, and the lie of the land which allowed the furnace to be built low down so the raw materials did not need raising very high. However, this was a period of development in blast furnace design and some of the features of Moira Furnace do not appear to have been successful. It was brought into blast in 1806, and used intermittently until 1811, though the foundry remained in use until after 1844 by utilising iron brought in from elsewhere.

Moira Furnace 1/5

Moira Furnace is a nineteenth-century iron-making blast furnace located in Moira, Leicestershire on the banks of the Ashby-de-la-Zouch Canal. The building has been preserved by North West Leicestershire District Council as a museum featuring lime kilns and craft workshops.

 

It is a most important industrial monument, since it is remarkably well-preserved, and dates from a formative period of the Industrial Revolution.

 

In 1804 the Earl of Moira had the furnace constructed to take advantage of the iron ore and abundant coal which were present underground in the surrounding Ashby Woulds area owned by him. The location was chosen for its proximity to the Ashby Canal for transport, and the lie of the land which allowed the furnace to be built low down so the raw materials did not need raising very high. However, this was a period of development in blast furnace design and some of the features of Moira Furnace do not appear to have been successful. It was brought into blast in 1806, and used intermittently until 1811, though the foundry remained in use until after 1844 by utilising iron brought in from elsewhere.

comments (24)

This is a grand old building Brian... you have framed it perfectly... i enjoyed the history of the Blast Furnace.... it is much better looking than the furnaces at the INCO mill in Sudbury ON where i was born and raised.....petersmile
Brian Walbey: Yes they are much more of an eye sore these days Peter.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 9 Jan 2012, 07:28
The architectural design is simple but stunning, Brian. My kind of place to see!
Brian Walbey: yes I like the shape of this Ginnie but quite how it actually worked I haven't much idea about.
Remarkable building, image and text. Indeed, Brian! smile
Brian Walbey: Thanks Juan.
Quite a nice and massive building Brian!
Thanks for the narrative.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard.
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet.
  • 9 Jan 2012, 08:13
A fine example of industrial might Brian. I suppose these buildings would need to be pretty robust.
Brian Walbey: The walls are quite thick, it would have been interesting to see it at work if somewhat dirty.
I love the angle
Brian Walbey: Yes it seems to tower over the footpath and canal behind.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 9 Jan 2012, 08:55
It is so pleasing that it has escaped demolition Brian: what a wonderful & vigorous shape it has
Brian Walbey: Yes I like the shape, I guess it is that shape for a purpose.
Successful or not, it's s beautiful building and the furnace building is, to me, a great piece of architecture.
Brian Walbey: Ye it is fortunate it hasn't been knocked down and the surrounding area has been nicely landscaped as well.
Fine shot, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Tom.
This is well worth preserving Brian, a wonderful building. A very nice shot.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Frances. Yes part of the industrial heritage for the area around my way.
A fine piece if industrial architecture Brian
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Bill, how fortunate it hasn't been knocked down.
Nice capture of a distinguished looking building Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Fred.
very nice
great history to go with it also.
like the plane contrails as a juxtaposition against the historic view confronting us
Brian Walbey: The plane trails were a stroke of good fortune to be honest Rob, thanks for your comment.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 9 Jan 2012, 14:12
What an impressive brickstone building you very finely captured! Interesting to read about the iron-making blast furnace, a kind of industry I never heard about before.
Brian Walbey: Yes and isn't it a good thing this place has been preserved.
  • Alan
  • Hanging around Covent Garden
  • 9 Jan 2012, 16:01
well, I learn something new every day. This is a cracking image and fascinating notes to go with it. How fortunate that this place has been preserved in this way.
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed Alan it is a very interesting pace to go, and there is a good museum inside.
A very interesting looking place Brian, Industrial heritage.
Brian Walbey: Yes it is a bit out of the ordinary isn't it.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 9 Jan 2012, 17:02
This is a wonderful building and I think that in the time they realy used this one for making iron, it must have been alive with lots of people and noise and heat.
You did a great job, beautiful picture, love the shadows.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Astrid. I bet this place was full of noise, smoke, dirt and everything else when it was active.
  • lisl
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 9 Jan 2012, 17:36
I've never seen anything quite like this before, Brian. You do have some superb brickwork where you live
Brian Walbey: Yes I hadn't even heard of this place before we moved here in 1989. There was quite a lot of brick making in the area way back many years ago.
A most interesting building,it looks to been well maintained by the council.
Brian Walbey: Yes the council seem to be doing something right for a change, let's hope it's upkeep isn't included in any cuts they seem to be making willy nilly at the moment.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 9 Jan 2012, 23:39
Certainly worthy of preservation, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Indeed it is Ray, and a fine place to visit, it has a good museum inside.
A most interesting place. Lovely shot of this!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Elizabeth, yes another of those places that make the area we live in so interesting.
A unique looking structure for sure. A lovely day for this nice shot Brian.
Brian Walbey: Yes I'd not seen anything like it before Jacquelyn. It was a very nice afternoon, I was on a shoot with some friends from my camera club.
  • Linda
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 Jan 2012, 19:48
This is a fantastic building Brian smile
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Linda, what a good job it hasn't been knocked down.
This is so unique to my eyes. Thank goodness it was preserved. Well shot from this angle, Brian.
Brian Walbey: yes the only one of its kind still left over here I think Beverly, thanks for your comment.

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