brianaw

20 Oct 2011 209 views
 
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photoblog image Cleeve Abbey 4/7

Cleeve Abbey 4/7

Soon after Cleeve became Crown property, it was leased to Anthony Busterd for 21 years.  In 1538, the freehold of the site was granted to Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex.  The church was demolished, save for the south wall which bounded the cloister, and the rest of the abbey converted into a mansion suitable for a gentleman.  By the early seventeenth century, however, Cleeve had turned into a farm.  The dormitory was now a large barn, the cloister was the farmyard and the rest of the buildings were used for agricultural purposes and a farmhouse.

 

The stairs in this image lead to the upper floors and round to the Refectory and the archway is in the end of the Chapter House that you will see tomorrow.

Cleeve Abbey 4/7

Soon after Cleeve became Crown property, it was leased to Anthony Busterd for 21 years.  In 1538, the freehold of the site was granted to Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex.  The church was demolished, save for the south wall which bounded the cloister, and the rest of the abbey converted into a mansion suitable for a gentleman.  By the early seventeenth century, however, Cleeve had turned into a farm.  The dormitory was now a large barn, the cloister was the farmyard and the rest of the buildings were used for agricultural purposes and a farmhouse.

 

The stairs in this image lead to the upper floors and round to the Refectory and the archway is in the end of the Chapter House that you will see tomorrow.

comments (17)

This is a very interesting set of pictures Brian. The building must have been something to see when it was built.
Brian Walbey: I always get a feeling when I visit places like this that I could be transported back in time just to get a glimpse of what it was really like all those years ago, is that me being a bit fanciful.
Wow, if those stones could talk! This image just oozes history, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed Beverly, wouldn't it be good to be able to see back in time for a few minutes.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 Oct 2011, 01:57
Best in series, so far, Brian.

What a beautiful place!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ray, I'm glad your enjoying this series, still a bit more to go yet.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 20 Oct 2011, 07:15
Just as well it was turned into a farm Brian otherwise it wouldn't be here now
Brian Walbey: Too true Chris, the restoration work they have done is superb.
Lovely colours in the stonework Brian
Brian Walbey: Yes a real mix of colours Bill.
You can't beat well weathered stone work
Brian Walbey: Several hundred years of weathering here Richard.
After all these centuries, it looks a bit fragile.
Brian Walbey: I guess so Mary but it has been very well restored and is looked after very well by the national English Heritage organisation.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 20 Oct 2011, 11:13
Wonderful stone work
Brian Walbey: Lots of lovely coloured stone isn't it vintage.
I like the ancient steps Brian. Makes you want to go in and explore.
Brian Walbey: It does Janet and for the life of me I can't remember if I went up those stairs or not, I was dashing about snapping while the rest of the party were getting an introductory talk as I didn't want all them in my pictures.
I love that old brick look in this photo, it feels natural somehow
Brian Walbey: Yes there is a lovely mix of colours isn't there.
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet.
  • 20 Oct 2011, 13:06
What a clever idea not to leave your guests in the rain whilst waiting for you to answer the bell.
Brian Walbey: I hadn't thought of that Chad.
It has certainly stood the test of time, Brian!
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed Tom, although some of the place has been knocked down over the years sadly.
  • Debb
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 Oct 2011, 16:21
What a beautiful old building. Yup, if walls could talk...
Brian Walbey: I often wonder what it would be like to pop back in time just for a few minutes and see what it was actually like then.
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 Oct 2011, 17:11
Interesting collection of stones they have used to build this - I like the different colours.
Brian Walbey: Yes I wonder if they are all local stone or brought in from elsewhere.
I like this one, Brian. Can almost feel the texture of the stonework.
Brian Walbey: It is lovely old stonework isn't it.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 20 Oct 2011, 20:04
I like the different colours of stones I didn't realize before and the bending staircase! Did stand sculptures or column in the niches of the archway? Early Gothic style?
Brian Walbey: I don't know about sculptures Philine but you will see the other side of the arched window on Friday.
This is really a remarkable place! You're capturing it well!

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camera Olympus E-450
exposure mode program mode
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