brianaw

10 Jan 2011 219 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image (North Wales Notebook)  Beddgelert 1/5

(North Wales Notebook) Beddgelert 1/5

We had a weeks holiday in Porthmadog, North Wales in early September and so for the next few weeks I will be featuring a variety of images and collages, and a mix of subjects, which I hope you find entertaining.

 

One of the most popular tourist spots in this part of North Wales is the village of Beddgelert and this is the centre of the village with the river running through.  Sadly the weather was very changeable whilst we were there as you can see from this image.

 

Beddgelert (Meaning the grave of Gelert ) was once described as "a few dozen hard grey houses ... huddled together in some majestic mountain scenery". This village, just south of Snowdon, owes its fame to the story of Prince Llewelyn ap Iorwerth who decided on a hunting trip and left his infant son in the charge of his faithful dog Gelert. On his return, the Prince was greeted by Gelert, who noticed the dog's muzzle was soaked in blood, and his son was nowhere to be seen. Llewelyn attacked the dog, and it fell to the ground gravely injured. However, within minutes he heard a cry and stumbled through nearby bushes to find his son, safe in his cradle. Beside the cradle lay the body of a giant wolf covered with wounds, the result of a fight to the death with hound Gelert. Llewelyn strode back to his faithful dog and watched it die from his actions.

 

The truth is that this story was made up by local traders some time ago in an attempt to lure Snowdon's visitors to their village. It appears the place name actually refers to Gelert, a sixth century saint from the area. This legend was well known by the time George Borrow visited Beddgelert in 1854 as part of the journey through the country the results of which he published in 1862 in his book tilted 'Wild Wales'

(North Wales Notebook) Beddgelert 1/5

We had a weeks holiday in Porthmadog, North Wales in early September and so for the next few weeks I will be featuring a variety of images and collages, and a mix of subjects, which I hope you find entertaining.

 

One of the most popular tourist spots in this part of North Wales is the village of Beddgelert and this is the centre of the village with the river running through.  Sadly the weather was very changeable whilst we were there as you can see from this image.

 

Beddgelert (Meaning the grave of Gelert ) was once described as "a few dozen hard grey houses ... huddled together in some majestic mountain scenery". This village, just south of Snowdon, owes its fame to the story of Prince Llewelyn ap Iorwerth who decided on a hunting trip and left his infant son in the charge of his faithful dog Gelert. On his return, the Prince was greeted by Gelert, who noticed the dog's muzzle was soaked in blood, and his son was nowhere to be seen. Llewelyn attacked the dog, and it fell to the ground gravely injured. However, within minutes he heard a cry and stumbled through nearby bushes to find his son, safe in his cradle. Beside the cradle lay the body of a giant wolf covered with wounds, the result of a fight to the death with hound Gelert. Llewelyn strode back to his faithful dog and watched it die from his actions.

 

The truth is that this story was made up by local traders some time ago in an attempt to lure Snowdon's visitors to their village. It appears the place name actually refers to Gelert, a sixth century saint from the area. This legend was well known by the time George Borrow visited Beddgelert in 1854 as part of the journey through the country the results of which he published in 1862 in his book tilted 'Wild Wales'

comments (19)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 10 Jan 2011, 00:42
Stunning photo
Brian Walbey: Many thanks vintage.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 10 Jan 2011, 06:55
The image is of a soulful place I'd love to visit, Brian. But the story broke my heart!
Brian Walbey: But at least the story is only a fable Ginnie, the place is lovely, in fine weather!
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 Jan 2011, 07:01
I've heard that story before, Brain. It certainly works in bringing in the visitors. Your images typifies the village; only the post box gives this much colour.
Brian Walbey: Yes there wasn't a lot of colour that day, it kept raining on and off so it looked a bit dismal.
I bet this river fills up rapidly after storms Brian.
Brian Walbey: I can imagine it does Chad.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 10 Jan 2011, 07:52
This is full of charm Brian
Brian Walbey: It is a charming village Chris.
Strong countryside ... fabulous area to explore
Brian Walbey: The whole area is delightful Richard.
  • Chantal
  • Nederland
  • 10 Jan 2011, 09:43
make it into sepia and you have a winner to me
Brian Walbey: I might give that a try Chantal.
I know its romantic to have a cottage on the banks of the river, but I would hate to live this close.

Traders will do almost anything to get the customers in. Even today!
Brian Walbey: Yes the front doors come straight out on to the footpath but it is a very nice village Sheila.
Nice shot. We stayed at a hotel near Devil's Bridge for a night last week, named after George Borrow who had stayed there several times.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks John.
This part of Wales is unbelievably beautiful Brian. The dullness of the weather does not mar the character of the stone cottages.
Brian Walbey: I think the dullness helps bring out the colour of the stone cottages Pamela, and the village is really set nicely in the mountains, althoug I bet it is a nightmare in the snow.
Lovely old stone and the river in spate!
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed, thanks Tom.
Can't beat a good story to bring in the tourists! As the newspapers say..never let the truth get in the way of a good story
Brian Walbey: Lol. It's called advertising and publicity Bill, although Beddgelert doesn't really need it.
Lovely scnerey!!
Brian Walbey: Set deep in the Snowdon mountains Marion it is a delightful village.
Regardless of the weather, Brian, this shot is a stunner.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Beverly.
We have an identical shot of this Brian..although the sun was shining..Its a lovely view of this quaint place.
Brian Walbey: The sun popped out for a little while Ron but it fell down with just after this shot was taken.
Beautiful scenery, nothing like a good tale smile
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed Linda.
lovley picturesque shot
Brian Walbey: Thanks Derek.
This looks almost unchanged from my distant childhood - I remember going on a touring holiday of N Wales when I was about 6 or 7.
Brian Walbey: Yes I guess this place will never change very much Ingrid.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 12 Jan 2011, 02:51
Lovely image, and a nice stream, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ray.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon PowerShot G10
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/320s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 12.1mm
(North Wales Notebook)  Around Porthmadog 5/5(North Wales Not...
(North Wales Notebook)  Beddgelert 2/5(North Wales Not...

Warning