brianaw

29 Nov 2010 318 views
 
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photoblog image Ickworth House 1/7

Ickworth House 1/7

On the way home from our Suffolk holiday we called in at Ickworth House, a National Trust property just outside Bury St.Edmunds.

 

The weather turned a bit unsettled as we arrived at Ickworth so I grabbed this shot of the Rotunda, the part of the building it is particularly famous for, but from there on my outside shots were taken in the rain.

 

The exterior of the Earl-Bishop’s Rotunda was virtually finished when he died in 1803, but the interior was still an empty shell, and the curving corridors and wings only a few feet above ground. It was left to the Earl-Bishop’s son, the future 1st Marquess of Bristol, to make what use he could of his father’s extraordinary plan. Having no need for massive galleries, in 1821 he instructed his architect, John Field, to redesign the East Wing as family living-quarters.

 

Field fitted out the ground floor of the Rotunda as staterooms in an austere Regency style. The West Wing was added purely for symmetry and so was left empty.

 

The carvings on the right are just a few of those round a lower part of the Rotunda.

Ickworth House 1/7

On the way home from our Suffolk holiday we called in at Ickworth House, a National Trust property just outside Bury St.Edmunds.

 

The weather turned a bit unsettled as we arrived at Ickworth so I grabbed this shot of the Rotunda, the part of the building it is particularly famous for, but from there on my outside shots were taken in the rain.

 

The exterior of the Earl-Bishop’s Rotunda was virtually finished when he died in 1803, but the interior was still an empty shell, and the curving corridors and wings only a few feet above ground. It was left to the Earl-Bishop’s son, the future 1st Marquess of Bristol, to make what use he could of his father’s extraordinary plan. Having no need for massive galleries, in 1821 he instructed his architect, John Field, to redesign the East Wing as family living-quarters.

 

Field fitted out the ground floor of the Rotunda as staterooms in an austere Regency style. The West Wing was added purely for symmetry and so was left empty.

 

The carvings on the right are just a few of those round a lower part of the Rotunda.

comments (22)

  • vintage
  • Brisbane Australia
  • 29 Nov 2010, 00:45
Good photos here Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks vintage.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 29 Nov 2010, 06:22
Great use of the light whilst you had it Brian
Brian Walbey: A very quick grab shot Tony.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 29 Nov 2010, 07:04
I really like how you have put this together, Brian. Very pleasing to the eye!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ginnie.
Imagine being able to build a huge wing on a house just so it looks symmetrical?
Brian Walbey: That's what money does Bill.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 29 Nov 2010, 07:49
Crikey Brian - this looks both classic & finely detailed too. Never heard of the place before!
Brian Walbey: The inside is nice as well Chris, some shots later in the week.
I've never been there Brian, or to Bury St. Edmunds, come to that. Looks interesting.
Brian Walbey: It is a lovely place Sheila, they do a nice lunch as well.
  • Chantal
  • Germany
  • 29 Nov 2010, 09:52
I like the new way of presentation
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chantal.
Very good presentation.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Mary.
From my visits there Brian, I gleened that some generations of the Marquess of Bath had rather reckless and riotus life styles.

Too much money and bored I guess.

Well presented Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard. I thought you probably would have called in here at some time.
very nice sir
Brian Walbey: Thanks Rob.
A bit different from the norm. Nicely presented Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Janet.
Great presentation Brian & quality shots of what looks to be a beautiful building.
Brian Walbey: It is lovely inside Tim as you will see later in the week.
An unusual and impressive house, a well framed shot Brian.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks jOHN.
A fine place to explore..and nicely presented Brian.
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed and thanks Ron.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 29 Nov 2010, 18:25
A wonderful collage again Brian, great skies and POV.
Thanks for the education!
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Astrid.
It took us fourteen years to agree on a small kitchen extension.
Brian Walbey: And I bet she still isn't satisfied with it Martinsmile
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 29 Nov 2010, 18:46
Lol at the previous comment. A very grand structure and it looks so un-English.
Brian Walbey: Yes it is a fine building Ingrid, it was a nuisance it rained before I had chance to take many shots outside.
  • Chad Doveton
  • where longitude meets latitude.
  • 29 Nov 2010, 19:15
Love the way you have presented the reliefs Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chad.
another great house, and well presented
Brian Walbey: Thanks Derek.
What an elegant building, even if it did start out as a bit of a follyish venture. Love the carving. Great photos and beautifully presented. (:o)
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Rosalyn.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 29 Nov 2010, 21:44
Now, I've been here; funnily enough on way to Southwold! It is a fabulous place from the outside but I never saw any more of the inside than the loos! Those carvings are amazing.
Brian Walbey: We got inside and I showing a few shots from there later in the week Alan.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 29 Nov 2010, 22:50
Impressive building, and you have presented it beautifully, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Ray.

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