brianaw

22 Nov 2010 231 views
 
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photoblog image Southwold Church 1/7

Southwold Church 1/7

The parish church of St.Edmunds in Southwold is very Suffolk church in style and has a really outstanding feature you will see later in the week.

 

Sadly repair works were going on at the eastern end of the church, hence the scaffolding, but I think from this shot you can see what a beautiful church it is.

 

St Edmund is all of a piece. It was built over a period of about 60 years from the 1430s to the 1490s. It replaced an earlier, smaller church that had been destroyed by fire. The earlier church dated from the 13th century, when Southwold was but a fishing hamlet of larger Reydon. But by the 15th century Southwold was an important town, and that is why this church has a municipal feel to it.

If we approach from the west, what strikes us first is the amazing flushwork of the tower. Knapped and unknapped flints pick out patterns, textures and designs in stone. Most famously, the curving letters over the west window: SCT. EDMUND ORA P. NOBIS (St Edmund pray for us). Each letter is royally crowned, and set in knapped flints. Whatever must the townsfolk have made of that during the liturgical darkness of the 17th and 18th centuries.

A magnificent and majestic church, large, well proportioned and beautifully maintained. The whole church was rebuilt in the 15th Century and was planned and conceived as a whole under a continuous roof. The exterior is an excellent example of East Anglian flushwork, and the interior is equally splendid.

Southwold Church 1/7

The parish church of St.Edmunds in Southwold is very Suffolk church in style and has a really outstanding feature you will see later in the week.

 

Sadly repair works were going on at the eastern end of the church, hence the scaffolding, but I think from this shot you can see what a beautiful church it is.

 

St Edmund is all of a piece. It was built over a period of about 60 years from the 1430s to the 1490s. It replaced an earlier, smaller church that had been destroyed by fire. The earlier church dated from the 13th century, when Southwold was but a fishing hamlet of larger Reydon. But by the 15th century Southwold was an important town, and that is why this church has a municipal feel to it.

If we approach from the west, what strikes us first is the amazing flushwork of the tower. Knapped and unknapped flints pick out patterns, textures and designs in stone. Most famously, the curving letters over the west window: SCT. EDMUND ORA P. NOBIS (St Edmund pray for us). Each letter is royally crowned, and set in knapped flints. Whatever must the townsfolk have made of that during the liturgical darkness of the 17th and 18th centuries.

A magnificent and majestic church, large, well proportioned and beautifully maintained. The whole church was rebuilt in the 15th Century and was planned and conceived as a whole under a continuous roof. The exterior is an excellent example of East Anglian flushwork, and the interior is equally splendid.

comments (22)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 22 Nov 2010, 03:41
Very impressive structure, Brian.

They don't make aircraft hangars like that any more, heh!
Brian Walbey: Lol. This was why I wanted to go to Southwold that day Ray, it is a great church.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 22 Nov 2010, 06:51
The more you look at this architecturally, Brian, the grander it becomes before your very eyes. I especially like your POV from the graveyard.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ginnie, I was a bit dissapointed about the scaffolding but had to make the best of it.
A very smart looking church, and tall too Brian.
Brian Walbey: It is a lovely church Chad, not unlike the one at Cromer further along the coast and also Blythburgh.
Yes, Brian, it does look like a magnificent place. Looking forward to seeing what else makes it special.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Sheila. What I consider the highlight is on Friday.
My old observer's book of churches has a picture taken from almost the same spot. It also mentions the fine flush work this church has. I look forward to this series Brian!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill, I hope you enjoy the rest of this week then.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 22 Nov 2010, 09:03
I've been inside here a few times Brian: it is a most impressive structure inside & out
Brian Walbey: Then you might be aware of what I think is a beautiful feature Chris.
This is a wonderful structure Brian.
Very nicely captured!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Richard.
I like the respctful way you captured this
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chantal.
Lovely and sharp but with wonderful soft colour. Like it Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Pamela.
Such a grand building Brian.
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Ron, thanks.
Its good to see they have the money to renovate the church, its a lovely building smile
Brian Walbey: Well I was a bit annoyed about the scaffolding Linda but if it needs work done then that's o.k.with me.
Impressive and imposing. Nice shot Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks John.
I reckon this is the best shooting angle to get an overall impression of the building. Good stuff Brian
Brian Walbey: Yes it is IMHO Richard.
What a really grand parish church. Wonderfully captured. I, too, like the point of view and inclusion of the graves - I think it humanises the building. (:o)
Brian Walbey: It is a magnificent church Rosalyn.
You can get a feel for its great age with the inclusion of the ancient looking grave stones. Incredible structure, Brian; well captured.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Beverly.
Beautiful church Brian, Well captured by yourself.smile
Brian Walbey: Thanks Tim.
Most impressive, they must have been extremely wealthy to build such a church.
Brian Walbey: I suspect you may be right there Martin.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 22 Nov 2010, 17:49
Wonderful architecture and than those stones.
Beautiful picture, so much to see, I think in real it is majestic.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Astrid, it is a lovely church inside and out.
impressive looking church
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Derek.
Looks similar to Gloucester Cathedral in construction
Brian Walbey: I'll have to take your word for that Nigel, I have yet to pay a visit to Gloucester. The churches at Cromer and Blythburgh are similar to this, I guess it is an East Anglian thing.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Nov 2010, 21:44
It is a beautiful church, as you stay. The scaffolding takes nothing away from it. I'm looking forward to the series.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Alan, the highlight, IMHO, is on Friday.
Wow! What an amazing church. I hope you were able to go inside, I'm guessing it will be full of light.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ellie. I just know you will enjoy what you see inside this church, the highlight, IMHO, is on Friday.

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