brianaw

26 Oct 2010 3,376 views
 
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photoblog image Somerleyton Hall 2/5

Somerleyton Hall 2/5

The final week at Somerleyton will show you some shots of the hall itself. We did not go inside, there is a lot of ground to cover and things to see just in the gardens I showed you last week.

 

The back of the hall has the garden I showed you last week leading up to it.  As you can see it is a lovely building.

 

The Hall’s final and most drastic alteration took place in 1843 under new ownership of a wealthy Victorian entrepreneur Samuel Morton Peto who hired John Thomas, Prince Albert’s favourite architect, to carry out extensive rebuilding.

Carved Caen stone was used to dress the exterior red brick of the original house, sumptuous materials utilised to embellish the interiors, paintings commissioned for the house and the parkland was completely transformed and redesigned.

This flurry of activities came to an abrupt end when the money ran out and Samuel Morton Peto went bankrupt. The house was sold to Sir Francis Crossley, the son of a Yorkshire-based carpet manufacturer who purchased the Somerleyton estate in 1863. Since mid-19th century the estate has remained in the hands of the Crossley family who are continuing to play an active role in the conservation of the house and grounds and enjoy living in this magnificent mansion.

Somerleyton Hall 2/5

The final week at Somerleyton will show you some shots of the hall itself. We did not go inside, there is a lot of ground to cover and things to see just in the gardens I showed you last week.

 

The back of the hall has the garden I showed you last week leading up to it.  As you can see it is a lovely building.

 

The Hall’s final and most drastic alteration took place in 1843 under new ownership of a wealthy Victorian entrepreneur Samuel Morton Peto who hired John Thomas, Prince Albert’s favourite architect, to carry out extensive rebuilding.

Carved Caen stone was used to dress the exterior red brick of the original house, sumptuous materials utilised to embellish the interiors, paintings commissioned for the house and the parkland was completely transformed and redesigned.

This flurry of activities came to an abrupt end when the money ran out and Samuel Morton Peto went bankrupt. The house was sold to Sir Francis Crossley, the son of a Yorkshire-based carpet manufacturer who purchased the Somerleyton estate in 1863. Since mid-19th century the estate has remained in the hands of the Crossley family who are continuing to play an active role in the conservation of the house and grounds and enjoy living in this magnificent mansion.

comments (17)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 26 Oct 2010, 00:10
Great capture of this wonderful building love the windows
Brian Walbey: I quite liked the design of the windows and the dark red surrounding walls vintage.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 26 Oct 2010, 01:59
Excellent...but, looks like the topiarist is not a person given to artistic flair.
Brian Walbey: No he isn't Ray, it's just a great big blobby bush.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 26 Oct 2010, 06:50
Without the Caen stone the place would have a completely different character
Brian Walbey: It certainly gives a nice contrast in colours Chris.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 26 Oct 2010, 07:47
Very magestic and nicely composed Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Tony.
The whole set of these pictures have been wonderful Brian, and the information you have given us has been really interesting.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Shaun.
There is something warm and homely about the mix of stone and brick.
Brian Walbey: I felt that Chad, a good choice of colours.
They are doing a really good job of the up keep of it all. It looks just as good from the back a the front Brian smile
Brian Walbey: It is a very attractive house Linda, sadly I was shooting almost into the sun from this side and didn't get such a lovely blue sky.
The front looks very grand, but I think I prefer this shot of the back more than the front. Beautiful building.
Brian Walbey: It is a lovely building Sheila, next time we will go inside if we pass that way again.
Fine view, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Tom, thanks.
A grand pile, it has a slightly continental look.
nice. i just watched a movie about Prince Albert.
I love learning about the architects involved too.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Alicia.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 Oct 2010, 18:27
Ah yes! Crossley Carepts! Good to see that the family are still connected with the property. This is a fine view with the flower trough providing a good foreground.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Alan.
It is a magnificent place. I like your composition, with the foreground interest, and the wonderfully trimmed tree. (:o)
Brian Walbey: I took several with objects in the foreground, I felt this was the best Rosalyn.
It is a very fine house Brian
Brian Walbey: It is indeed Bill, but not National Trust.
bet you were there for hours, its a wonderful place, another great shot
Brian Walbey: We were there several hours Derek and then went on to where you will see next week.
A gorgeous building Brian and that's a nice angle you captured there.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Janet.
I'd hate to be paying the electric bill!
Brian Walbey: So would I David.

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