brianaw

20 Jul 2010 222 views
 
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photoblog image 'Scene' in Dorset - Corfe Castle 6/6

'Scene' in Dorset - Corfe Castle 6/6

This "longish" series comprises a variety of subjects and shots I took during our April visit to Dorset for our nephews wedding.

The Church of St. Edward the Martyr was the 13th century parish church for Corfe Castle village in Dorset. It stands on a raised area off the village square, near the entrance to the ruins of Corfe Castle after which the village is named.

 

The church is named after King Edward who was assassinated on the site of Corfe Castle in 978, reputedly on the orders of his step-mother. It is said that the church stands on the site of a blind woman's cottage in which the kings body was taken after he was killed. The Kings coffin now rests in the Church on the Wall in Wareham, but his body was taken to Shaftesbury Abbey in 1001 after reported miracles and a dream.

 

Edward was the son of King Edgar's first wife, Ethelfleda, who died before Edgar did. Edgar then married Aelfthryth who bore him Ethelred. Edward became king on the death of Edgar in 975, but Aelfthryth contested this wishing her son Ethelred to take the throne. His murder in 978 cleared the throne for Ethelred the Unready (Redeless).

 

During the English Civil War in the 17th century Parliamentary gunners occupied the church and removed lead from the roof to make shot. The damage was not repaired and the church gradually fell into disrepair. Only the tower of the current church building dates from the 13th century. The rest is a 19th century Gothic church.

'Scene' in Dorset - Corfe Castle 6/6

This "longish" series comprises a variety of subjects and shots I took during our April visit to Dorset for our nephews wedding.

The Church of St. Edward the Martyr was the 13th century parish church for Corfe Castle village in Dorset. It stands on a raised area off the village square, near the entrance to the ruins of Corfe Castle after which the village is named.

 

The church is named after King Edward who was assassinated on the site of Corfe Castle in 978, reputedly on the orders of his step-mother. It is said that the church stands on the site of a blind woman's cottage in which the kings body was taken after he was killed. The Kings coffin now rests in the Church on the Wall in Wareham, but his body was taken to Shaftesbury Abbey in 1001 after reported miracles and a dream.

 

Edward was the son of King Edgar's first wife, Ethelfleda, who died before Edgar did. Edgar then married Aelfthryth who bore him Ethelred. Edward became king on the death of Edgar in 975, but Aelfthryth contested this wishing her son Ethelred to take the throne. His murder in 978 cleared the throne for Ethelred the Unready (Redeless).

 

During the English Civil War in the 17th century Parliamentary gunners occupied the church and removed lead from the roof to make shot. The damage was not repaired and the church gradually fell into disrepair. Only the tower of the current church building dates from the 13th century. The rest is a 19th century Gothic church.

comments (14)

another nice collage, amazing how these old churches as so well kept
Brian Walbey: I always enjoy photographing in churches derek, I done 3 more up in Suffolk last week.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 20 Jul 2010, 01:40
Good collection of photo Brian interesting Information thank you
Brian Walbey: Thanks vintage.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 Jul 2010, 03:14
Looks likes folks in these parts are into Winged Critters, Brian...I wonder if they have Pigeon Clubs? [grin]


Fine Montage.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ray. That winged critter isn't all that big so i was pleased with the shot of that.
The good old Victorian makeover eh? Excellent collage Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill. At least it is restored and back in use albeit with a touch of the Victorian influence.
Lovely collage Brian. Murder and miracles, vandalism and war - not much has changed over the centuries has it.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Sheila. Well Corfe does seem a bit more civilised these days, all tourists etc.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 20 Jul 2010, 07:57
Hahaha - I went here too Brian: I have been following you around! Seriously this is a fine record of the place. A pity the Victorians got to it in the 19th century though
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chris. At least the Victorians restored a ruin and it is back in use. Tomorrow I will follow your recent postings to Swanage.
  • Aussie
  • Rockhampton
  • 20 Jul 2010, 10:19
Lovely collection of images of this historic church
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Aussie.
I always enjoy visiting Corfe village and the walks over the hills with fantastic views. A good series Brian. Corfe must be one of the most photogenic places in England.
Brian Walbey: Thanks John, it is a lovely village spoilt by the yellow lines everywhere sadly. I always think it is on a par with places like Castle Combe photogenically.
Just another fine collage Brian, you are a true specialist in collages!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Marion, I do enjoy collages and for some subjects, like this one for instance, I feel it is better to do a collage than post the shots seperately when each may not be that interesting on its own.
Really like these montages of yours.
smile
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Rob.
Quite a history here Brian. Thanks for that and the fine collage.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Janet.
Nice compilation, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Tom.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 20 Jul 2010, 20:46
Great series again Brian, it ia always a delight to look at your post, so much information, so much to see, thank you for that.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Astrid, I'm glad your are able to find time once again to look at our postings.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 20 Jul 2010, 21:19
Fascinating notes, Brian, to accompany the fine set of images. I especially like the lectern. I never knew about the lead flashing off the roof and the resulting "new" church.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Alan, a church with an unusual history I think.

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