brianaw

06 Apr 2010 383 views
 
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photoblog image Church Visits - 2009    2/15

Church Visits - 2009 2/15

During 2009 I visited 15 churches and featured some of them occasionally on SC. in part.  This series will cover all of them, and for this series you will see that I have used a common theme of layout and presentation for each, which I hope you will enjoy, together with a short piece of sacred music that I hope you will find time to enjoy also.

This church is deep in the Severn Valley in the village of Arley, next door to the arboretum I featured earlier this year.

St. Peter's is a simple sandstone church, oringally dating from the late 12th century, but with later additions and some traces of a still earlier church. Looking out acrss the Severn valley, it is situated on a rise above the village and is adjacent to arley Arboretum and the site of the former Arley Caster. For many vistors to Arley it is a place of great beauty and one for tranquil reflection.

The building bears testimony to the history of the area since medieval times. The oldest monument is the 13th century 'Crusader', believed to be Sir Walter de Bohum, the first husband of Isolda de Mortimer.

After 150 years in the possession of the Mortimer family Arley passed, in the 15th century, into the ownership of the Lytteltons, a family more usually associated with Hagley. They lived primarily at Arley for the 100 years before the building of the present Hagley Hall in the 1750s. The Lyttelton famliy monuments in St Peter's relate to this period in their family history.

Lucy Lyttelton married Arthur anneslet, Viscount Valentia (later Earl Mountnorris) in 1763 and the estate was bequeathed to their son George in 1779. Again there are monuments to this family, this time both within the church and outside, in the magnificence of the trees of Arley Arboretum, first planted by Viscount Valentia in the early 19th century.

The later development of the church was shaped by the Woodward family, who owned Arley from 1852 to 1959. They rebuilt the chancel, re-ordered the interior and introduced a heating system. It was at this time that the stained glass was installed, the chancel window being by Kempe. Their work recognised the need for the church to be not just a monument to the past but a place of worship to meet the needs of the present.

Similar thoughts were in the mind of the present congregation when the recent amenities addition was erected in 2005.

The church is open during daylight hours and guidance notes are available.

">Ave Verum


Church Visits - 2009 2/15

During 2009 I visited 15 churches and featured some of them occasionally on SC. in part.  This series will cover all of them, and for this series you will see that I have used a common theme of layout and presentation for each, which I hope you will enjoy, together with a short piece of sacred music that I hope you will find time to enjoy also.

This church is deep in the Severn Valley in the village of Arley, next door to the arboretum I featured earlier this year.

St. Peter's is a simple sandstone church, oringally dating from the late 12th century, but with later additions and some traces of a still earlier church. Looking out acrss the Severn valley, it is situated on a rise above the village and is adjacent to arley Arboretum and the site of the former Arley Caster. For many vistors to Arley it is a place of great beauty and one for tranquil reflection.

The building bears testimony to the history of the area since medieval times. The oldest monument is the 13th century 'Crusader', believed to be Sir Walter de Bohum, the first husband of Isolda de Mortimer.

After 150 years in the possession of the Mortimer family Arley passed, in the 15th century, into the ownership of the Lytteltons, a family more usually associated with Hagley. They lived primarily at Arley for the 100 years before the building of the present Hagley Hall in the 1750s. The Lyttelton famliy monuments in St Peter's relate to this period in their family history.

Lucy Lyttelton married Arthur anneslet, Viscount Valentia (later Earl Mountnorris) in 1763 and the estate was bequeathed to their son George in 1779. Again there are monuments to this family, this time both within the church and outside, in the magnificence of the trees of Arley Arboretum, first planted by Viscount Valentia in the early 19th century.

The later development of the church was shaped by the Woodward family, who owned Arley from 1852 to 1959. They rebuilt the chancel, re-ordered the interior and introduced a heating system. It was at this time that the stained glass was installed, the chancel window being by Kempe. Their work recognised the need for the church to be not just a monument to the past but a place of worship to meet the needs of the present.

Similar thoughts were in the mind of the present congregation when the recent amenities addition was erected in 2005.

The church is open during daylight hours and guidance notes are available.

">Ave Verum


comments (15)

another great montage Brian, like this way to show the church
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Derek.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 6 Apr 2010, 02:57
You montage work is impeccable, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ray, I hope you aren't too fed up by the end of the series though.
Great images, beautifully displayed.
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Sheila.
Another fine set Brian. Ange and I have wandered around this church too.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill. So you were right next door to the Arboretum then if you visited this church.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 6 Apr 2010, 08:14
You are good at these montages Brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Vintage.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 6 Apr 2010, 08:28
All very full of character Brian: these layouts of yours are very effective
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chris, I hope you still feel the same by the end of the series.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 6 Apr 2010, 08:33
Always enjoy reading the history Brian. Another great montage
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Tony.
Another lovely array.
Great series!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Rob.
They are good to see inside as well as out smile
Brian Walbey: I just like going in to churches Linda, they are all so different.
Another wonderful montage Brian!
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Richard.
That's a fine tower, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Indeed it is Tom, I don't think the church is used very much these days sadly.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 6 Apr 2010, 12:52
Another interesting set of images, Brian and good notes, too; they alwaty help my appreciation of what I'm looking at.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Alan.
Another well presented collage Brian. Well done
Brian Walbey: Many thanks Janet.
Nicely done again Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ron.
  • Les Auld
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 Apr 2010, 21:11
Another good collection Brian, what do you use for framing?
Brian Walbey: Thanks les. The border is a freebie I got from somewhere, I have attached it in a seperate email to you.

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