brianaw

01 Jul 2009 259 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image All Saints Church, Kedleston

All Saints Church, Kedleston

All Saints Church is owned by the Churches Conservation Trust and is described as "the only survivor of the medieval village of Kedleston" – indeed when the Curzons decided to build Kedleston Hall the village was moved to "make space" for the country estate

All Saints is mainly a 13th Century building, but the south doorway is Norman and has the telltale zigzag carving with elaborate, if somewhat worn carvings above the door of horsemen tracking down wild beasties. As with all churches of its era it acts as a testimonial to the wealthy and influential property owners – in the case of Kedleston that is, of course the Curzon family. There are some outstanding marble tombs the largest being in the most prominent chapel opposite the entrance. The white marble almost glows with a spooky aura as the sun casts a myriad of colours around the carefully crafted monument. A monument with considerate angels tending to the needs of Lord Curzon and his wife, Mary. It is, as I read somewhere, "a dazzling white tomb" lovingly constructed under the direct supervision of Lord Curzon on the death of his beloved wife. The tomb is encased behind a chapel screen with a contrasting green translucent quart floor and a black plinth, giving a contrasting and yet lavish appearance. It’s a stunning and dominant sight.

I can confirm that this is a very nice church inside and perhaps sometime I might show a selection of photos I took.

All Saints Church, Kedleston

All Saints Church is owned by the Churches Conservation Trust and is described as "the only survivor of the medieval village of Kedleston" – indeed when the Curzons decided to build Kedleston Hall the village was moved to "make space" for the country estate

All Saints is mainly a 13th Century building, but the south doorway is Norman and has the telltale zigzag carving with elaborate, if somewhat worn carvings above the door of horsemen tracking down wild beasties. As with all churches of its era it acts as a testimonial to the wealthy and influential property owners – in the case of Kedleston that is, of course the Curzon family. There are some outstanding marble tombs the largest being in the most prominent chapel opposite the entrance. The white marble almost glows with a spooky aura as the sun casts a myriad of colours around the carefully crafted monument. A monument with considerate angels tending to the needs of Lord Curzon and his wife, Mary. It is, as I read somewhere, "a dazzling white tomb" lovingly constructed under the direct supervision of Lord Curzon on the death of his beloved wife. The tomb is encased behind a chapel screen with a contrasting green translucent quart floor and a black plinth, giving a contrasting and yet lavish appearance. It’s a stunning and dominant sight.

I can confirm that this is a very nice church inside and perhaps sometime I might show a selection of photos I took.

comments (15)

  • Aussie
  • Australia
  • 1 Jul 2009, 00:24
The age of these building is just mind bogling in comparison to anything in this country. I think that is why I always wanted to visit the UK and Europe.
Brian Walbey: Hopefully you may make it back again in the future Aussie and see more of these treasures we have here.
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 1 Jul 2009, 01:35
Aussie has the same reaction as I do...and this is why I LOVE Europe. It's hard to believe structures can be this old and still be standing, let alone be so lovely.
Brian Walbey: You are just so right Ginnie, I suppose throughout Europe the majority of people are proud of their heritage, mind you there are places in USA I would like to see bit know I never will.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 1 Jul 2009, 02:51
All that, and a postcard sky to finish it off. Excellent, Brian.
Brian Walbey: I couldn't have asked for a better sky Ray, it is the original.
Good stuff Brian and it would be nice to see inside
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill, I did take some inside shots but it was full of people and very cramped. Perhaps a modest collage in a few weeks time.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 1 Jul 2009, 07:04
Nice picture Brian - in days of yore they could do things like this at will: moving a village to get more privacy for themselves!
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chris, I suppose when they owned all around them they could do as they liked.
  • graham pickett
  • SUNNY ~~SOUTHSEA~~~ENGLAND
  • 1 Jul 2009, 07:13
Nice capture Brian,also very well written text to go with it.Was the sky that blue or have you done a little twiddle?
Brian Walbey: Thanks Graham, no this is ot a twiddle just the marvellous sky we had throughout the visit.
And there were we thinking "land grab" was a modern concept!
Lovely photo, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Sheila.
Funny how these churches do not look the same with blue skies. We seem to expect grey.
Brian Walbey: Your are right Chad, but doesn't the sunshine lift the wonderful colour of the stone.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 1 Jul 2009, 10:05
Simply unheard of age here, remarkable state of preservation, fine image brian
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Tony.
Wonderful capture Brian. Looking forward for more to come!
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Richard, this series runs until Sunday.
these are great
never gets boring this series
Cheers
Rob
Brian Walbey: Thanks Rob, this series goes on until Sunday.
Got to admit Brian that English Churches make fine subjects for us photographers, must sort out some of mine when I get a chance. Nice composition and well presented.
Brian Walbey: Thanks very much Les.
As chad said....Nice to see the blue sky in the church pic's Brian.
Brian Walbey: Yes indeed Ron,and there is more of that today here in Leicestershire.
Nice shot Brian. Good to see folks sitting outside.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Janet. The people outside were from the Churches Commission who look after the church now it is unused.
  • Mia
  • United States
  • 1 Jul 2009, 19:38
I love churches and this one for the building in the middle, at the top it feels like medieval archers will pop out of nowhere. I've obviously been watching too many movies... your brief history lesson, coupled with the image was great smile
Brian Walbey: Thanks Mia, I'm glad you enjoyed my picture of the church.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Olympus E-300
exposure mode program mode
shutterspeed 1/250s
aperture f/11.0
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 14.0mm
All AboardAll Aboard
All Saints Church, LoughboroughAll Saints Churc...

Warning