brianaw

16 May 2009 367 views
 
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photoblog image Thrumpton Hall, Nottinghamshire

Thrumpton Hall, Nottinghamshire

The past five days have featured a set of five collages taken at a country fair in the grounds of this lovely hall on Easter Monday.

Thrumpton Hall has a remarkable history that reaches back into the 16th century, when it belonged to the Powdrills, a Roman Catholic family who lost their home and lands through their involvement in the regicidal Babington Plot. (The plot was led by their young neighbour, Anthony Babington, who owned the Kingston on Soar estate.) Remains of the ancient Powdrill house can still be seen in the wall timbers, a Priest's hiding hole and a secret staircase, leading up to what was the Powdrill family chapel.

In 1605, a new family took over Thrumpton. The Pigotts already had local connections at Ratcliffe-on-Soar. They were both ambitious and politically amoral; the second Gervase Pigott used the fortune of his wife (a local Miss St Andrews, from Gotham) to transform the Powdrill manor house into a magnificant mansion. He removed much of the old interior, in order to create a magnificent carved staircase and an exquisite double-cube reception room overlooking his formal garden.

Ambition ruined the Pigotts; in 1685, the house was taken over by their lawyer, a Mr Emerton, to whom they had been unable to keep up mortgage payments.

In the 1820's, the house and lands underwent a significant transformation. Mr John Emerton, said to be the most handsome man in Nottinghamshire, spent what was then the enormous sum of seventy thousand pounds on improvements:  these included creating a beautiful lake that lies in front of the house. The pavilion which now stands to the west of the house, looks towards Mr Emerton's lake; beyond it, lies the magnificent 350 acre park which he and his descendants landscaped and planted with rare specimen trees, including several magnificent Lebanon cedars.

In 1838, the house was inherited by Mr Emerton's 16 year old niece, whose marriage to Lord Byron brought many fascinating Byron relics to the house. Lord Byron's nephew (the 10th Lord Byron) was succeeded by his nephew, George Fitzroy Seymour, father of the present owner. George and the Hon. Rosemary Seymour (a sister of the 8th Lord Howard de Walden) devoted some fifty years to the restoration and preservation of this beloved family home.

The house has been owned, since 1994, by Miranda Seymour and her husband, Ted Lynch, who share it with Miranda's mother.

 

Thrumpton Hall, Nottinghamshire

The past five days have featured a set of five collages taken at a country fair in the grounds of this lovely hall on Easter Monday.

Thrumpton Hall has a remarkable history that reaches back into the 16th century, when it belonged to the Powdrills, a Roman Catholic family who lost their home and lands through their involvement in the regicidal Babington Plot. (The plot was led by their young neighbour, Anthony Babington, who owned the Kingston on Soar estate.) Remains of the ancient Powdrill house can still be seen in the wall timbers, a Priest's hiding hole and a secret staircase, leading up to what was the Powdrill family chapel.

In 1605, a new family took over Thrumpton. The Pigotts already had local connections at Ratcliffe-on-Soar. They were both ambitious and politically amoral; the second Gervase Pigott used the fortune of his wife (a local Miss St Andrews, from Gotham) to transform the Powdrill manor house into a magnificant mansion. He removed much of the old interior, in order to create a magnificent carved staircase and an exquisite double-cube reception room overlooking his formal garden.

Ambition ruined the Pigotts; in 1685, the house was taken over by their lawyer, a Mr Emerton, to whom they had been unable to keep up mortgage payments.

In the 1820's, the house and lands underwent a significant transformation. Mr John Emerton, said to be the most handsome man in Nottinghamshire, spent what was then the enormous sum of seventy thousand pounds on improvements:  these included creating a beautiful lake that lies in front of the house. The pavilion which now stands to the west of the house, looks towards Mr Emerton's lake; beyond it, lies the magnificent 350 acre park which he and his descendants landscaped and planted with rare specimen trees, including several magnificent Lebanon cedars.

In 1838, the house was inherited by Mr Emerton's 16 year old niece, whose marriage to Lord Byron brought many fascinating Byron relics to the house. Lord Byron's nephew (the 10th Lord Byron) was succeeded by his nephew, George Fitzroy Seymour, father of the present owner. George and the Hon. Rosemary Seymour (a sister of the 8th Lord Howard de Walden) devoted some fifty years to the restoration and preservation of this beloved family home.

The house has been owned, since 1994, by Miranda Seymour and her husband, Ted Lynch, who share it with Miranda's mother.

 

comments (9)

  • zed
  • Australia
  • 16 May 2009, 03:51
Great framing Brian, history behind the hall brings the image to life
Brian Walbey: Thanks Tony.
Nice picture, dodgy frame, but who am I to talk! Interesting text too.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Bill, the frame was a freebie from a CD if I recall.
This picture should be hanging in that house/hall Brian. They may well buy it from you. Nice one.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ron, no doubt they will have plenty of paintings of the hall done over the centuries.
A wonderful picture nicely framed Brian. Thanks for the history lesson.
Brian Walbey: Thanks for your comment Richard.
nice picture for sure.
Not sure the frame does it for me .. smile
Cheers
Rob
Brian Walbey: Thanks Rob, the frame was an afterthought, not really sure about it myself.
Optical Illusion, the grass in the forefront is sharp, the house is sharp, the lawn infront of the house looks fussy. Weird
Brian Walbey: This has had a bit of twiddle in Topaz Adjust Martin, hence some some strange effects. Thanks for your comment.
That house tells a few stories I bet. Nice shot Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Janet. I suspect most of these old houses have a story to tell.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 16 May 2009, 20:09
It looks a very charming place Brian
Brian Walbey: It was a nice place Chris, hopefully we will go there again.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 17 May 2009, 11:40
Very picturesque, to go with its fascinating history, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Ray, certainly this house does have quite a history.

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