brianaw

03 Apr 2018 71 views
 
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photoblog image Staunton Harold Revisited 2/7

Staunton Harold Revisited 2/7

The house there now was built by the 1st. and 5th. Earl Ferrers between 1700 and 1780. In 1940 the army used it for barracks before it became a prisoner of war camp firstly for Italian and the German prisoners. After the war it became a Cheshire Home and then a Sue Ryder Hospice before being sold to private owners. The church is now owned by the National Trust and as this picture shows it is currently undergoing much needed renovations.

Staunton Harold Revisited 2/7

The house there now was built by the 1st. and 5th. Earl Ferrers between 1700 and 1780. In 1940 the army used it for barracks before it became a prisoner of war camp firstly for Italian and the German prisoners. After the war it became a Cheshire Home and then a Sue Ryder Hospice before being sold to private owners. The church is now owned by the National Trust and as this picture shows it is currently undergoing much needed renovations.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 3 Apr 2018, 00:20
Love the grounds in which it stands, Brian.
Brian Walbey: It is in a lovely setting, behind me are hundreds of acres of parkland for walking.
Quite a place, quite a history, Brian.
Brian Walbey: Indeed Frank, I have put the abreviated version down here.
Superbe panorama.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Martine.
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 3 Apr 2018, 06:38
A lovely picture Brian, cropped (I presume) to perfection
Brian Walbey: Thanks Chris.
A handsome house with quite a history Brian. Nice letter box type crop
Brian Walbey: I have put the abreviated version down here.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 3 Apr 2018, 09:12
One could write a book about the fall and rise of the stately Home.
Brian Walbey: It would take more than one book Chad.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 3 Apr 2018, 12:42
I can easily imagine the other uses, but a POW camp? Get the auld ones to knit them nose warmers as well ...
Brian Walbey: yes the POW camp didn't gel with me either, especially as the place is now.
The pond enjoys a fine home to look out on.
Brian Walbey: It is actually quite a big lake rather than a pond, the one I showed yesterday is off to the right on the other side of a causeway.
A very handsome house!
Brian Walbey: It is, a shame it is now closed to the public, when we first moved this way some of it was still open to the general public, as was the garden.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 3 Apr 2018, 16:53
This could be my place - what a beautiful view on the manor house and the church!
Brian Walbey: I wouldn't mind having the house as long as somebody payed for the upkeep of it smile
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 3 Apr 2018, 16:57
The house seems to have gone full circle. Odd for the National Trust to own a Church without the corresponding house
Brian Walbey: I've always thought that strange, I guess there is a reason in the history of the place explaining that anomaly.
i like the wide view, Brian. the tree to right of the house (as in this view) is rather nice to me.
Brian Walbey: It is a fine view across the lake and there are several trees like this oen about.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Apr 2018, 21:18
Lovely light in this, It really makes the facade oft eh house stand out.
Brian Walbey: We were so lucky with the lovely morning we had, we took a short walk and retired to one of the two excellent tearooms there for lunch.
Beautiful image, gives a sense of peace and tranquility.
Brian Walbey: Thanks Claudio, it certainly was that day, we were just about the only people there.

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